Under The Radar: Jack Lipton

Jack Lipton is holding fast to his original gameplan, and it looks like the rest of the planet might be coming around full circle. You might remember Jack from The Penetrators, a Syracuse-area garage band that struggled to make its mark in a market more focused on the seedlings of hair metal. Of course, karma is a bitch – none of those spandexy preeners lasted while The Flashcubes, Hamell On Trial and Masters Of Reality are still writing and recording music thirty years later for a global audience. (Oh, Syracuse…”you coulda been a contender“).

Although The Pentetrators took a bit of abuse at the time – count me among the original naysayers – garage fans around the country thought otherwise and treasured their worn tapes of “Scandalizer” and “Drive Me Crazy”. And while they might not have hit the level of The Chesterfield Kings or The Oblivians, their recorded legacy is available for your own ears to judge.

Lipton’s most recent appearance is with Mark Doyle as part of his latest project Mark Doyle and the Maniacs  (more on that soon). But you can be certain that wherever Jack is, there will be rocking.

Cult of personality

Cult of personality

(Here’s the review of Bad Boy that ran on Pop Culture Press not long ago – the EP was later expanded into Bad Woman)

Bad boy Jack Lipton first warped ears with his classic garage band The Penetrators while trying to claw his was out of dead-end Syracuse New York. Not much has changed in Jack’s attitude – older, yes, mellower, never. Instead, garage rock has come full circle and pulled up to Jack’s stop once again. Passionate but straightforward rocking covers of “Search And Destroy” and “Dirty Water” feature fellow Syracusans turned Beantowners Ducky Carlisle, Paul Armstrong and Mark Doyle.

More impressive are the other two tracks, collaborations with producer and multi-instrumentalist John Fannon. “Get Off That Corner” is Lipton’s take on urban gospel, while “Trouble” boasts a great hook, melody and harp-driven chorus – great, gritty pop soul by way of latter-day Ian Hunter. Dare I say a commercial garage sound? Too few tracks to proclaim the second coming, but interesting enough to hope for a full length. 

Visit Jack’s website.

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Filed under Music, Orphaned, Reviews

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