Blast From The Past: Simon and Garfunkel

Art Garfunkel was no Andrew Ridgeley.

Simon and Garfunkel were one of the most successful pop acts of all time; no one could offer a sane counter-argument to that. But when people started to realize that Paul Simon wrote all the music and lyrics and sang half the harmonies, suddenly Art Garfunkel’s worth was in question. Hell, Paul Simon drew the same (wrong) conclusion and soon went solo.

But then they went out with a bang.

 “Bridge Over Troubled Water” is not only one of the biggest hits of all time, it’s arguably one of the very best pop vocal performances ever recorded. And while those might have been Mr. Simon’s words that were being sung, it was the majestic pipes of Art Garfunkel that took a great song and made it a timeless classic. Think I’m wrong? Find me a cover version from this enormous list that could dare to stand next to the original.

“Bridge Over Troubled Water” turns forty this year. Check out the other top hits from 1970 and you’ll see how much it stuck out like a sore thumb. It was heavily lyrical and had orchestral movements; almost operatic in its scope. It’s confessional, nakedly emotional, and one of the most powerful songs ever written about reaching out to someone who needs you.

When this single was released, it was when the hit-single conscious AM radio of the 60s was crashing headlong into the album rock of the 70s in an explosion that would change music forever. But while bubblegum, rock’n’roll, Motown and folk were all peppering the airwaves with enjoyable music, this track indeed was a cut above.

Hear for yourself:  “Bridge Over Troubled Water

I can still listen to this album today and get the same rush I did when I first heard it. I used to be able to play a few of the songs on guitar; Lord knows how many times I’ve sung along to the stereo, with the car radio, or with a group of friends during late night jams. But I think a couple of these tracks (and “Bridge” is one) provide an incredibly spiritual experience through a pair of headphones (or leaking from your speakers in a dark room, late at night).

And consider that all of that was just the title track. The album – like all of theirs, really – was filled with top-notch songs. “Cecilia”, “Song For The Asking”, “The Only Living Boy In New York”…hell, I could write an entire essay just discussing “The Boxer”.

Sounds like a plan.

Listen to clips from the album at Amazon.

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