Tag Archives: Cha Cha

T.G.I.F. – Ten Daunting Dates

November 5th is one of those dates that makes one wonder whether the stars truly do align; a cluster of famous people’s births, deaths or accomplishments sharing the same 24 hour cycle albeit years apart. Not ready to believe my always-too-generically-positive horoscope just yet, but whether coincidence or fate, there’s no denying the facts.

Actually, it’s one of those days where I could have lowered the bar and listed another two dozen people famous for one thing or another. But when you combine the man who popularized slapstick comedy, a rebel drawn and quartered for trying to overthrow a government, one of the most ferocious rock’n’roll talents of the 70s and 80s and…hell…the man who invented time travel, why lower your standards?

So here are Ten Daunting Dates from history, all of which occurred on November 5th. Have a great weekend!

(01) 1605 The Gunpowder Plot…a conspiracy of men try to blow up the House of Lords and put an end to big government; now we do this with Tea Parties. Of course today they commemorate the event and celebrate Guy Fawkes Day with fireworks. Brits love their irony.

(02) 1931 Ike Turner is born…We lost Ike three years ago, but his musical legacy lives on. A violent and misogynistic man, he nevertheless discovered a ton of musical talent – hello, Tina – and is one of the forefathers of rock’n’roll.

(03) 1941 Art Garfunkel is born…Yes, Paul Simon wrote all those brilliant songs, played the guitar and even sang well. But Artie had the voice of an angel and his harmonies made those songs come alive. The coda to “Bridge Over Troubled Water” still gives me goosebumps.

(04) 1942 George M. Cohan dies…known best as the patriotic composer of wartime anthems, Cohan dominated Vaudeville and Broadway and was one of the pioneers of musical comedy theatre. James Cagney won his only Best Actor statue for portraying him in Yankee Doodle Dandy.

(05) 1943 Sam Shepard is born…Brilliant playwright and actor, among many other talents.You know some of his plays like True West and Buried Child and his many acting roles (most famously Chuck Yeager in The Right Stuff) but did you know his early science fiction play inspired Rocky Horror?

Cosmic American

(06) 1946 Gram Parsons is born…Hard to believe Parsons crammed it all in before he died at twenty-six, but you can trace Americana and Alternative Country music right back to his doorstep…not to mention the twang that the Rolling Stones ingested into their sound in the early 70s. A genius.

(07) 1946 Herman Brood is born…The junkie/porn star/rocker leapt to his death nine years ago leaving behind a legacy of music and art that sadly never found an audience in the states. But I will put Cha Cha up against any live album you have, anywhere,  anytime.

(08) 1947 Peter Noone is born…Noone – Herman of Herman’s Hermits to you – is still going strong. Touring the world sounding like a man half his age, he continues playing that string of classic 60s pop singles to audiences of all ages. Someone sign him and get him some Mike Viola songs to sing!

(09) 1955 Doc Brown invents time travel…oh hell, you wouldn’t believe me if I told you. Whatever he’s got to tell you, you’ll find out through the natural course of time…

(10) 1960 Mack Sennett dies…Fifty years ago, the man who gave us the Keystone Kops, Charlie Chaplin, W.C.Fields, Gloria Swanson, Harry Langdon, Ben Turpin and Mabel Normand left this mortal coil. But his work is immortal, and if those names don’t all ring a bell you have some serious homework to do.

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Blast From The Past: Roger C. Reale

This, folks, is the Reale Deal.

This, folks, is the Reale Deal.

Everybody has an album that sits atop their list of “records that need to be on CD”. Mine is Radioactive by Roger C. Reale and Rue Morgue. One of the great perks of working in a record store was the ability to crack open an interesting looking record and see what it was all about. For example, I thought the song titles on Slug Line were as off-the-wall as the horrible picture of the artist on the front cover, and that album wound up changing my life. (Thanks, John Hiatt!). I also found Herman Brood’s Cha Cha mistakenly filed in the disco section, but I can’t blame the clerk for that when the cover looked like this. Another lifelong partnership between an artist and my ears.

I had that same gobsmacking wallop when I slapped Radioactive on the turntable, but sadly it would turn out to be a one shot deal. It did lead me to grab everything I could get my hands on from Big Sound Records, where Jon Tiven and Van Duren and Doc Cavalier and Ivan Julian and G.E. Smith held court, but those are stories for another day…especially since G.E. Smith’s In The World might be #2 on that “needs to be on CD” list. Roger C. Reale did guest on a lot of albums and reappeared last decade to record an EP with his friends The Reducers and then started a more traditional bluesy rock band called The Manchurians. But none of them were like this.

So if you’re going to make one album before sliding off the radar screen, why not spike the ball and run? Clocking in at less than twenty-five minutes (!), Reale and his crack band (popster Hilly Michaels on drums and G.E. Smith – yes, that one – on guitar) just torched their way through crunhing rock originals and a couple of killer covers. Reale’s voice was as low as his bass and was powerful enough to saddle up this sonic typhoon of a trio and take it for a spin. Every track was roll-down-the-windows, sing along at the top of your lungs rock’n’roll. No wasted notes, nothing fancy, just clever lyrics and gigantic hooks propelled by a truly melodic power trio.

“Stop and Go”, “Pain Killer” and “Please Believe Me” were pop enough to be hits, while “Madonna’s Last Stand”, “Kill Me” and “High Society” could power a muscle car down a highway by themselves. And the covers were fabulous – a druggy, droning take on The Troggs’  “I Can’t Control Myself” and the most kinetic, manic cover of Chuck Berry’s “Dear Dad” you will ever hear in your life. Because it is so long out of print and never was issued on CD…I can point you here so you can join me in celebrating this masterpiece of an album. (Kudos to Angelo, who has obviously had the same epiphany.)

Thirty-one years later and I still play the shit out of this record, it’s absolutely timeless. I will play this record until the day I die and then pack it for the trip to the great beyond.

Roger C. Reale, you flat out rock!

The official Manchurians MySpace site and their CD BABY page.

An outdated Manchurians site – track list info, a couple of MP3 links and links to purchase the CDs.

An outdated Reducers/Roger C Reale page with info about the EP and one MP3.

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Blast From The Past: Herman Brood

 

I Blew My Cool Over You

I Blew My Cool Over You

HERMAN BROOD

Brood Box (Sony BMG import)

The late, great Herman Brood was a junkie, a porn star, an artist, a rock god and arguably the biggest thing since sliced bread in the Netherlands. Although he had but a moment of fame in the USA (“Saturday Night” was a Top Forty hit in 1978), to the kids in his homeland he was Elvis, loved with the same passion and reverence that Irish kids had for Rory Gallagher. In poor health and unable to shake the consequences of a long-term drug habit he leapt to his death from the Amsterdam Hilton in 2001. Most of his recorded work has never been issued in America and many of the European titles fell out of print.

Now, thankfully, many of the titles have been remastered and reissued, including this boxed set of his first five records plus a sixth disc (Kidstuff) unavailable elsewhere. Reasonably priced at about five dollars a disc, the original cover art is masterfully reproduced and the sound is pristine. A worthy investment for those of us who had the vinyl, it’s a mandatory purchase for any rock’n’roll fan. Brood originals merged old school soul and Motown and jazz with scathing Chuck Berry and Little Richard rave-ups, and he was hip enough to cover John Hiatt, Graham Parker and Lou Reed long before most American artists caught on. The live record Cha Cha is a blistering testament to his energetic live shows and is among the best live rock records ever made.

Frank Black was so inspired by Brood that he unearthed his Black Francis moniker for the first time in twenty years and recorded an album about him (Bluefinger) including a cover of “You Can’t Break A Heart and Have It”. But all you will need for inspiration is your wallet and your ears.  

Saturday Night

Rock And Roll Junkie

Dope Sucks

I Love You Like I Love Myself

Sleepin Bird

***

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