Tag Archives: Dan Hartman

T.G.I.F. – Ten Rockin’ Recollections

I can’t really listen to the radio anymore.

Stations today pretty much suck. Much like chain store record department employees, most on-air people are out of their depth. They don’t have a good grasp of what they’re trying to sell or present. They aren’t lifers. They don’t live and breathe the music. Perhaps that has a lot to do with the fact that they’re not choosing what to play (or in the case of the chain store clerk, they are not there by choice but promoted from the small appliances department).

Oldies radio recycles the same few hits by the same few bands and never play the chestnuts. Hell, most of these stations are farmed in from a few central syndicates anyway, so the concept of a revisiting a regional classic is pretty much gone. Some consultant somewhere is choosing titles from a list of what their contractual rights enable them to play without paying additional royalties. It’s dull, lifeless, repetitive.

Oh, I know there are exceptions. There are a couple of guys in my town who have an occasional 3-4 hour slot that can be very entertaining, but the airtime doesn’t line up with my schedule. And maybe satellite radio would cure me of this low opinion; one listen to someone like Little Steven and you see what a world of difference it makes when the creator of the show is deeply invested in every song and detail. Like a great mixtape, each song brings a nod and a smile; it’s great when you’re on that wavelength.

But I don’t need radio anymore. It hasn’t been able to teach me anything in years…decades, perhaps. But I have a lifetime of music to draw upon, and a continuing pipeline of great music that real artists continue to make regardless of apathy, challenges and obstacles. Bless you, fellow zealots.

S0 this week I present you with ten rockin’ recollections, ten songs that I thought of while daydreaming this morning. There’s no logical sequence, it isn’t a mix, and although the thrust of it hovers in the 70s, it wasn’t by design. Just ten great songs that you’ll probably never hear on the radio, but they put a smile on my face and I hope they put a smile on yours.

Enjoy the weekend!

Graham Parker: “Temporary Beauty“. Nice live version from a guy who has been making one brilliant album after another for thirty-five years; he doesn’t get anywhere near the credit he deserves.

Santana: “Soul Sacrifice“. Michael Shrieve is mindblowing on drums; Santana wowed everybody at WoodstockShrieve, at twenty, looked like Sid Vicious!

The Cruzados: “Bed Of Lies“. Vastly underrated band who had a couple of excellent records in the 80s; even Dylan is a fan. This and “Motorcycle Girl” were my faves.

John Hiatt and Matthew Sweet): “Girlfriend“. From Vh-1 Duets. You know, back when music stations actually programmed music content? They also covered “I Wanna Be Sedated” that night!

? and the Mysterians: “Do Something To Me“. Garage gods! This song wasn’t a hit for them although Tommy James had success with it. They still sound great today.

Edgar Winter Group: “Queen of My DreamsDan Hartman goes all Led Zeppelin on us. He was the soul of this group and an incredible talent.

Montrose: “Bad Motor Scooter“. Still smokes 36 years later. Sammy had poodle hair, Ronnie Montrose left Edgar Winter after “Frankenstein”.

J. Geils Band: “Lookin’ For a Love“. Best. Party. Band. Ever. Saw a clip of them from a recent reunion and Peter Wolf can still work that stage like a scarecrow jacked up on coke.

Van Duren: “Grow Yourself Up“. Underknown pop giant who was part of the Memphis scene circa Big Star and came up to Connecticut to record at Big Sound Records. New album in 2010.

Johnny Winter: “Jumping Jack Flash“. With Floyd Radford and Randy Jo Hobbs, although they’re just hanging on for dear life. Johnny owns this song!

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Blast From The Past: Rick Derringer

I’ve been a fan of Rick Derringer‘s music as long as he’s been making it. I played The McCoys singles to death, devoured every album he made with Edgar and Johnny Winter, defended every solo album against a horde of haters, and air-guitared to every axe duel he had with Danny Johnson on those Derringer albums. Now 62, he’s spent the better part of the last two decades recording blues and smooth jazz records and being a vocal supporter of Christian and Conservative issues, although he still tours and cranks out the classics (albeit sometimes with slightly altered lyrics).

His omission from the hallowed halls in Cleveland is an injustice; his body of work as a recording artist and producer and performer is proof positive of an amazing legacy. Iconic songs like “Rock and Roll Hootchie Koo“, “Still Alive And Well” and “Hang On Sloopy” will continue to make kides jump out of seats long after he’s gone. And while I would love for him to crank out one more great rock’n’roll album, I’d happily settle for that country album he said he would make not long after All American Boy was released…

Cheap Tequila

I thought of him today for two reasons; I was playing the album whose review you will find below, and I saw that he will be a featured player in Ringo Starr‘s 2010 All Starr Band, which should do wonders to remind people that he is still out there playing with spirit and fire. Ringo has always been generous with the spotlight, and I’m sure those three songs mentioned above will ring out from summertime stages.

Here’s a link to the tour dates from Rick’s site.

Bear in mind that the review below was written ten years ago (almost to the day) for Consumable Online. A lot has changed since then – that great new label folded, Live In Cleveland did get released, and it’s now been an astonishing forty-five years that Rick Derringer has been rocking the world. Take a bow, Mr. Derringer.

He may not be in Cleveland’s Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame, but Rick Derringer was enshrined in mine years ago. From teen idol to third Winter Brother to guitar god to pop guy to blues man, Derringer has strapped on that guitar, hit the stage and kicked ass. Unfortunately, previous concert documents have not effectively captured what live audiences have enjoyed for so long. Derringer Live was good but spotty, and the King Biscuit release featured his last, weakest band lineup and too many guest stars. Only the radio promo Live In Cleveland  (there’s irony for you!) came close, but if the legitimate release has never made it to CD, don’t hold your breath for the promotional disc. A travesty.

Now that’s changed, thanks to Phoenix Media Group. With thousands of hours of live music tapes and radio  broadcasts at their disposal, the Phoenix Gems imprint will be used to get some classic (and in some cases, unheard) concerts out to the public. The first four releases feature The Tubes, Omar And The Howlers, Spirit, and this Derringer concert from late 1998 in Boston. Live At The Paradise Theater was the same show (and perhaps the same master tape) that was supposed to be released in 1998 under the Archive Alive label, but was shelved when the King Biscuit disc hit the market two months before. The sound quality is phenomenal, and if all Phoenix Media‘s shows are this crisp and clear, the market for live concerts just changed dramatically.

The first Derringer band, with axe whiz Danny Johnson, was more riff and jam oriented. After Johnson left, Derringer kept bassist Kenny Aaronson and brought in drummer Myron Grombacher. Recording as a trio (with some help from old pal Dan Hartman), If I Weren’t So Romantic, I’d Shoot You found Rick steering his band towards shorter, single oriented material. Needing a second guitarist for the road, he selected Neil Geraldo (who, with Grombacher, would anchor Pat Benatar‘s band for years afterwards). Although the band was only together briefly, Geraldo plays some great barrelhouse piano and trades leads on guitar, Grombacher is tireless, and Aaronson is an inventive, fluid anchor on bass. Sure, there’s the requisite speed-noodling on “Rock And Roll Hoochie Koo” and “Beyond The Universe,” and this talented group kept up with Derringer step for step.

What makes this disc really special are the moments when they absolutely rip through Derringer’s best mid-career songs. “Teenage Love Affair,” “Let Me In” (always Derringer’s best vocal) and the Chinn-Chapman hit “It Ain’t Funny” are on fire, while the finale of “Roll With Me,” “Back In The U.S.A.” and “Long Tall Sally” contain Derringer’s best work since the Roadwork album with Edgar Winter. The band was hot that night. Rick Derringer shows no signs of slowing down after over 35 years of rocking the world. Let this CD hold you over until he rocks your town again.

Ricky wiki

Some clips from the 2008 Derringer reunion tour.

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Four Little Frankensteins

Young Frankenstein

Young Frankenstein

 

Edgar Winter Group 1973

Frankenstein

 

Frankenstein Karloff

Old Frankenstein

 

Frankenstein 1910

REALLY Old Frankenstein

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