Tag Archives: David Lynch

Film Awards Keep Rolling In

Yesterday it was the Online Film Critics Society who handed out the hardware, and as these awards pile up, the Oscar favorites are starting to float to the top. In most of the major categories there are two strong contenders and a close field, although anything can happen, as we know.

So far I’ve not seen The Social Network. But despite my distaste for Facebook, it’s merely a coincidence; David Fincher and Aaron Sorkin are heavyweight names in my book. Much like my fever to see both The Town and The Fighter has far more to do with my love of crime thrillers and boxing films than my love of Boston. Although you’ve got to admit it – any Beantown film usually has a lot going for it. And I do love Boston.

The last two films I have seen – both within a week – are Inception and The Black Swan. Let’s just say that my mind feels like it was kicked around by a group of soccer hooligans, then trapped in a small room with Alfred Hitchcock, David Lynch and Brian DePalma vying for control.

The winners of the 2010 Online Film Critics Society Awards:

Best Picture: The Social Network
Best Director: David Fincher, The Social Network
Best Lead Actor: Colin Firth, The King’s Speech
Best Lead Actress: Natalie Portman, Black Swan
Best Supporting Actor: Christian Bale, The Fighter
Best Supporting Actress: Hailee Steinfeld, True Grit
Best Original Screenplay: Christopher Nolan, Inception
Best Adapted Screenplay: Aaron Sorkin, The Social Network
Best Cinematography: Roger Deakins, True Grit
Best Editing: Lee Smith, Inception
Best Animated Feature: Toy Story 3
Best Foreign Language Film: Mother
Best Documentary: Exit Through The Gift Shop

And speaking of The Town and Inception, R.I.P. Pete Postlethwaite, who passed away yesterday. He had many great roles over the years, but I’ll always think of him as the mysterious Kobayashi in The Usual Suspects.

"One cannot be betrayed if one has no people."

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T.G.I.F. – Ten for Dennis Hopper

This pretty much sums it up.

Actor, painter, director, producer, humanitarian, counterculture icon, thorn in the side of the predictable…we lost a great one this week when cancer claimed the life of Dennis Hopper. Like Keith Richards, most felt he wouldn’t make it out of the 60s alive, let alone the 70s, but both proved resourceful and resilient and capable of creating great work… albeit not quite as frequently. We were blessed to share this mortal coil with him for so long. 

Still, Hopper had a long and varied career in television and films, and a definitive best-of is impossibly subjective. But since he was such a character in real life, here are ten Dennis Hopper characters I will always remember: 


01) Billy in Easy Rider. The movie that started it all, or at least launched Hopper and Peter Fonda into the heart of the counterculture film movement that would change the face of Hollywood. “What the hell is wrong with freedom? That’s what it’s all about!” 

02) Lyle From Dallas in Red Rock West. It’s really Nicolas Cage’s picture, and one could argue that J.T. Walsh stole the picture (as he often did as  one of the best character actors of all time) in the role Hopper was initially cast in. But Hopper lights up the second half and raises the ante in this great John Dahl film. 

03) The Photojournalist in Apocalypse Now. In a world of madness, both real and scripted, Hopper’s acid casualty character might have been as insane as anyone else…or perhaps totally lucid but incapable of expressing himself. 


04) Clifford Worley in True Romance. A highly enjoyable Quentin Tarantino scripted movie that already spiked the oddball meter by casting Gary Oldman and Val Kilmer, among others. But the scene between Christopher Walken and Hopper is worth the price of admission. 

05) Frank Booth in Blue Velvet. An over-the-top performance that would normally have been too scenery-chewing, but how can you be over the top in a David Lynch film? Oh, a few f-bombs, as well. 

06) Billy Clanton in Gunfight at the O.K. Corral. Sharing the screen with heavyweights Burt Lancaster and Kirk Douglas in John Sturges‘ classic western. A small role, but Hopper shone as the kid gunfighter way out of his league. 

07) Jordan Benedict III in Giant. One of two pictures he made with James Dean; Giant had him playing against type as the mild-mannered son of macho Rock Hudson (who knew?) alongside Dean and Sal Mineo. An underrated soapy western from George Stevens featuring a tremendous cast. 

08) Victor Drazen on 24. Sure, it was a bit of a hammy accent, but how cool was it to have Hopper show up as the criminal mastermind to close out the first season? 

09) Shooter in Hoosiers. Yes, it was a part written to tug the heartstrings, and many actors would have cheesed it up beyond belief. But maybe seeing a man who had battled so many personal demons in real life made it more powerful. “Now boys…don’t get caught watchin’ the paint dry!” 

10) Feck in The River’s Edge. Things don’t get much stranger than when Crispin Glover is onscreen, but add Dennis Hopper and  an inflatable girlfriend, and there you are. (“Look, I’m not psycho. I know she’s a doll. Right, Elly?”) The movie that might have ruined Keanu Reeves forever

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Hot Tickets: More Mott and BeatleMania

Reunited and it feels so good

Reunited and it feels so good

 

Mott The Hoople announce the final dates of their HMV Hammersmith Apollo residency. The original two nights (October 2nd & 3rd) sold out in a weekend, and the first additional night (October1st) has now sold out as well. So due to high levels of public demand, Mott The Hoople have added two final shows at the Apollo on October 5th and 6th.

UK classic rock station Planet Rock has an exclusive seven day pre-sale for the two new Mott The Hoople dates at the HMV Hammersmith Apollo. This will be your best chance to get the best tickets available for the two new shows on October 5th and 6th . The pre-sale starts today and will run for 7 days. Click HERE.

***

Also on sale today are tickets to see The Twotles* next month at Radio City Music Hall in New York City.

Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr are teaming up to headline a benefit concert on April 4 for the David Lynch Foundation. Other performers joining the two superstars include Sheryl Crow, Eddie Vedder, Moby and Bettye LaVette. Tickets go on sale 11am EDT today through Ticketmaster. (Vedder has to be just thrilled about that!)

The David Lynch Foundation provides funds to teach students how to meditate so they can “change their world from within.” Yes, that David Lynch. Like me, you might find it a bit ironic that a man whose movies are among the most dense and confusing ever made is the founder of an organization to help children think more clearly, but it’s a serious and worthy endeavor.

(* it was so much more fun referring to surviving Beatles as The Threetles when George was alive.)

 

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