Tag Archives: Derek and the Dominoes

Layla at 40

One hit wonders, iconic albums, career peaks…you could file Layla under every one of those categories.  And while words like classic and timeless are tossed around too often, Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs – the sole studio effort by supergroup Derek and The Dominoes – fits that bill.

I’ve worn the damned thing out in almost every conceivable format; I’ve heard several boots of outtakes and demos and even spent many an hour sifting through the live albums (both official and not) over the years. But the twin guitars of Eric Clapton and Duane Allman, the piano section from Bobby Whitlock that even Goodfellas couldn’t rob, the constant battle over which of the four sides (that’s album talk, kids) was actually superior…these are memories and images that have stood the test of time.

I’m not a big fan of these highly priced reissues that expand original albums beyond belief; for some they are a true testimonial of respect while others are a transparent cash grab. But that’s not my wallet in your pocket; I’m just here to pass the word. Looks like there will be a two-CD edition and a fully loaded motherlode version which includes books, vinyl, DVD-audio and more. I’m probably shooting for the former, since it contains some great live material on the second disc as well as a remastered version of the original masterpiece. From the press release:

THE 2CD DELUXE EDITION features:

 • Six exciting performances from what was to be Derek and the Dominos’ second album, all remixed by the original session engineer, Andy Johns. The highlight of the six tracks is “Got To Get Better In A Little While” – the group’s last recording – presented in this collection both as a mesmerizing jam version and as the first-ever release of the fully produced studio version, finally completed by founding member Bobby Whitlock on keyboards and vocals.

 • All four audio performances from Derek and the Domino’s sole, historic television appearance on The Johnny Cash Show, November 9, 1970 – including Clapton’s famous jam on “Matchbox Blues” with Cash and rockabilly legend Carl Perkins.

 • The two tracks produced by Phil Spector in early summer 1970 that amounted to the first release by Derek and the Dominos: “Tell the Truth” and “Roll It Over,” the A- and B-side of a single that was quickly pulled from circulation by the group.

 • The Layla session out-take “Mean Old World”: the legendary acoustic duet performed by Eric Clapton and Duane Allman.

 The SUPER DELUXE EDITION additionally includes:

 • Newly remastered and expanded 2-CD set of Derek and the Dominos: In Concert, recorded at the Fillmore East and remastered from the original master tapes.

 • Audio only DVD featuring DTS 5.1 and Dolby Surround 5.1 versions of Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs mixed by legendary engineer Elliot Scheiner.

 • High-fidelity, 180-gram reproduction of the original vinyl double album, remastered directly from the original UK album masters, featuring slightly alternate mixes of some songs.   

 • A hardcover book, artfully designed with rare and never-seen photographs, and featuring four meticulously researched essays by noted music historian and author Ashley Kahn fashioned from new interviews with Bobby Whitlock, Allman Brothers drummer Butch Trucks, engineer Ashley Kahn , producer Albhy Galuten, guitarist Derek Trucks; plus historic interviews with Eric Clapton, Duane Allman, and producer Tom Dowd.

 • Facsimiles of Derek and the Dominos concert tickets and various promotional items, including the famous “Derek is Eric” button created to assure fans of the identity of the group’s lead singer and guitarist.

 • Pop-up 3-D artwork and a high quality Layla art print based on the oil painting that graced the original album cover – “La Fille Au Bouquet” by Emile Theodore Frandsen de Schomberg – which has achieved cultural significance in its own right.

 

Or maybe all you really need to do is pull that old vinyl album off the shelf…there’s nothing wrong with that. But either way, one listen will remind you that they just don’t make ’em like they used to.

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Under The Radar: Lions In The Street

Old souls in young musicians

Old souls in young musicians

I’ve been sitting on this one for a short time and was going to hold off on writing about them until their debut album came out (in the can and hopefully out very soon). But I listened to these songs again this weekend and I can’t keep this secret any longer. (Credit where credit is due…kudos to my fellow scribe Michael Toland and his blurb in The Big Takeover for turning me on to this one – thanks buddy, I owe you!)

You need to get on this bandwagon and do it right now.

These guys breathe the masters, old and new. Their southern gospel/blues and swamp rock fever features slide guitar, swirling organ and the heartbeat of a steam train. There are many young bands reaching back to the past for inspiration, like Rose Hill Drive and Wolfmother with Led Zeppelin and Cream, and The Darkness with Queen. But this band ranks among the best, and I’m as excited about them as I was when I stumbled upon Shuggie ten years ago (and yes, grab that before it disappears forever!). The Pacific Northwest strikes again; Shuggie was from Seattle, Lions In The Street are from Vancouver. But their sound defies locale and time.

It took me about four beats of “Shangri-La” to conjure up an image of Steve Marriott fronting The Black Crowes, and when the song changed tempo, Derek and the Dominoes. These are not compliments given lightly, folks – I revere those bands. “Ruthless Baby” is pure sweet soul; and just how do Canadians nail that sound of the American South filtered through a British Band’s ears? “Already Gone” recalls The Faces in their Nod era, as does “Mine Ain’t Yours”, which blatantly swipes the riff from “Stay With Me”. And “You’re Gonna Lose” is that irresistible greasy guitar blues that the Stones spat out with abandon when blessed with Mick Taylor as their lead player.

“Feels Like A Long Time” has a pretty standard chord structure (think “Can’t You See” by The Marshall Tucker Band), lifted by a yearning vocal – not unlike Jagger circa Flowers – and a brilliantly emotional guitar solo.  Not to mention anytime you have a Hammond adding flavor to the stew, the stew tastes much, much better. The slow burn and build of “Still The Same” has Adam Duritz written all over it.

But listen to the jewel in this collection, “Oh Carolina”, and tell me you’re not channeling the first Rod Stewart albums with Ron Wood and Martin Quittenton trading leads above Mickey Waller‘s pulse. I can play that song ten times in a row and get goosebumps every time – it’s among my favorite tracks of the year.

I cannot wait for this album to drop; if the rest of it is as good as these tracks we’re talking “best of” list for certain. Keep your eyes open, folks.

little lions

Clips of new songs and downloads of the ep Mixtape on the website are available for free (or you can donate if you want to). The details on that free EP – and the band’s perseverance – are here.

If you need Cat Got Your Tongue, try here, but hurry.

More sounds and info on their MySpace site.

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