Tag Archives: George Harrison

Paul Is Dead…Again?

Turn Me On, Dead Man…

Finally, so many things become clear. Wimpy duets with Michael Jackson. “Freedom“. Give My Regards To Broad Street. It wasn’t really him after all. The Last Testament Of George Harrison will make that clear.

From the press release: Until now, the “Paul is Dead” mystery that exploded worldwide in 1969 was considered a hoax. However, in this film, George Harrison reveals a secret Beatles history, chronicling McCartney’s fatal accident, the cover up, dozens of unknown clues, and a dangerous cat and mouse game with “Maxwell,” the Beatles’ MI5 handler, as John Lennon became increasingly reckless with the secret.  Harrison also insists that Lennon was assassinated in 1980 after he threatened to finally expose “Paul McCartney” as an imposter!

I remember writing a paper on this for school, where meticulous clues were organized, validated and dissected. Many of them can be found here and here. Some were very clever, like the visual clues on Magical Mystery Tour; no doubt this gave the pranking band members a great laugh. Some were simply absurd, like the Life Magazine cover. (Open the front cover page and hold it to the light and the image of a car is across Paul’s chest. Of course, the fact that a car ad was on the inside cover was completely coincidental…)

Who Buried Paul?

The imposter, if I remember correctly, was Canadian. Which means South Park was really, really late with this. In any case, fact or fiction, this is going to be really entertaining. The DVD will be released in the US this September.

Video: Clues Galore.

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New Album! D.Rogers

On his third album, Melbourne singer/songwriter D. Rogers offers up 14 short pop songs that are predominantly delicate melodies lovingly executed. Tapping a large pool of regional musicians, Rogers sparingly accessorizes his melodies with horns, strings, and handclaps.

Most tracks barely exceed the two minute mark, if that. His voice is appealing and the production is pristine, and although there are no songs you’ll nominate as anthems, it flows beautifully.

Listen to some clips at CD BABY

Read my review on PopMatters where I note the DNA of several popular touchstones, from Neil Finn and Crowded House to Beatles Paul, George and Ringo.

D. Rogers website

D. Rogers on MySpace

Popboomerang Records website

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All Together Now!

I enjoy documentary films. I love The Beatles.

Guess what?

The documentary film All Together Now traces the development of the collaborative Love project from its inception through its 2006 debut. What began as a conversation between George Harrison and Cirque du Soleil founder Guy Laliberte expanded into a massive undertaking that required years of preparation and unprecedented artistic partnerships between Cirque, Apple Corps and the Mirage Hotel.

Harrison was a fan of the unique artistry of the Cirque du Soleil performances and envisioned a bold and original rebirth of the Beatles’ catalogue. His death in 2001 provided an additional sense of purpose, although representatives for all four Beatles would need to agree on concept and execution. Director Adrian Wills follows the timeline and inserts the viewers into the process by letting them observe activity and conversations between principals rather than rely on first-person narrative. It’s a wise choice for such voyeuristic subject matter.

The pulse of the documentary is the immense amount of challenges faced by everyone involved. For Cirque du Soleil, this presentation was much more of a musical stage show than their previous productions, as well as being the first time working without a live band. Not only would the synchronization between acrobatics and music have to be exact, but they would have to rely upon the engineers to loop the recorded music if there was an accident or a technical glitch. Several of the performers were stage actors or dancers working in a completely new environment, admittedly working on blind faith until the rehearsals were finally moved to the working stage in Las Vegas.

The theatre itself was a massive undertaking; besides the elaborate stage and rigging there needed to be impeccable sound to truly envelop and involve the audience. The final design incorporated over 6,300 speakers and construction ran over $100 million.

Naturally, one of the biggest decisions revolved around how to utilize the Beatles music in the show. There had been many Beatle-oriented projects ranging from tribute bands to stage shows like Beatlemania, but the creators wanted to create a new dynamic that would go far beyond merely playing a set of Beatles songs in period costumes. When the idea of deconstructing and reassembling recorded tracks came up, the call went out to George Martin. As Ringo said, “he knows where all the skeletons are buried”.

Read my full review at PopMatters.

Afterwards, see the show.

All you need is...a plane ticket and cash.

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