Tag Archives: Golden Globe

T.G.I.F. – Ten Worthwhile Weblinks

Yes, I know…I’ve got to get an alliteration editor…

I’m in the midst of finalizing the countdowns for comedy CDs and DVDs (starts tomorrow!) and as usual have stumbled across a few things worth sharing. One of the drawbacks of the Internet is that there is so much out there, it gets harder and harder to maintain a good filter. I hope the Prescripton is part of your formula (just like most of the Blogroll – lower right column to you – helps me navigate oceans of content).

So today, a veritable potpourri of links – satire, movie trailers, MP3s of great songs…Ten Worthwhile Weblinks that will each take only a few minutes of your time. In this wireless age, perhaps this is the future of “bathroom reading”, a browser window in place of a paperback novel that has likely been handled by suspicious people with questionable hygiene. Assuming you are the master of your laptop, feel free to click away…

(01) Stewart Lee on Harry Potter – Lee is erudite, sarcastic, incisive, brilliant and one of the funniest people on the face of the Earth. This bit is but a gnat’s pimple of his recorded work, all of which is worth your immediate pilgrimage.

(02) Brighton Rock – Yes, they’re remaking the classic Graham Greene tale (the first starred a young Richard Attenborough in the role of “Pinky” – worth chasing down). Ominous music, looks cool.

(03) The Filthy 42s – they put out one album (the subject of an upcoming Under The Radar feature) and this great song didn’t make the cut. “Ain’t Nobody Gonna Hold Us Down” cross-breeds The Clash and The Rubinoos.

(04) Louis CK and Robert Smigel – as dog whisperers (before that was cool) in a sketch on a 1993 Conan O’Brien episode. Two words: Hair Triumph!

(05) Social Distortion – hey, SD has a brand new album!! Here’s a very Faces/Black Crowes sounding “Hustle and Flow“…

Living Candle, Zsa Zsa 2011, Black Drew Carey

(06) Paul F. Tompkins recaps American Idol – Talk about taking a bullet for a buddy! Why watch this if Paul is willing to do it for you?

(06) Gainsbourg – Obviously, I was born too late, in the wrong country, and with the wrong instincts.

(08) The Cynics – Any Sonny and Cher cover is fun, but these garage giants not only nail “I Got You Babe” but light the video on fire.

(09) Gilbert Gottfried Death or Ugu? Umm…not safe for work, home, public, careless forwarding…do you have headphones?

(10) Ricky Gervais – In case you’ve been living under a rock, here’s Golden Globe host Gervais ripping Hollywood a new one in 2010 and again in 2011. Savor the moment(s).

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Golden Globes Tonight

Well, this should be interesting…

Predicting the Golden Globe winners is a hit-and-miss affair, mostly because some of the members are plain batshit crazy. How else do you explain Johnny Depp’s two nominations in films that were widely panned?

But what the hell, I’ll take a crack at it. Below are my picks for who I think will win, not who I would want to win. And if you would like to play along, here’s a printable Globes ballot for you.

Best Picture (Drama)
The Social Network” – in a field of five good nominees, I would not be mad if any of them won.

Best Picture (Comedy/Musical)
The Kids Are All Right” – probably the perfect intersection of theme and actress for this voting group.

Best Director
Christopher Nolan, “Inception” – amazing film needs to get some reward, right?

Best Actor (Drama)
Colin Firth, “The King’s Speech” – great performance + voter guilt for prior exclusions

Best Actor (Comedy/Musical)
Johnny Depp, “Alice in Wonderland” – I would have wiped all five nominees and started fresh.

Best Actress (Drama)
Nicole Kidman, “Rabbit Hole” – I hope I’m wrong but the HFPA loves Nicole Kidman.

Best Actress (Comedy/Musical)
Annette Bening, “The Kids Are All Right” – see Nicole Kidman, above.

Best Supporting Actor
Christian Bale, “The Fighter” – if Michael Douglas wins I will shoot my television.

Best Supporting Actress
Melissa Leo, “The Fighter” – many say Helena Bonham Carter is a lock, but…

Best Screenplay
The Social Network” – Aaron Sorkin should be the safe bet here.

I can’t even bear to think about their television nominations because of the long list of oversights and the nomination of Matthew Morrison for Best Actor for Glee. But I am very much looking forward to watching Ricky Gervais eviscerate the celebrities.

My review of the show will run tomorrow.

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Stand Up Wit…Joan Rivers

I finally got to see the new Joan Rivers documentary, A Piece Of Work. While not a perfectly objective film – key people involved are her friends and she had suggestive input to the content – it paints what I believe to be a fairly honest picture of a driven artist who won’t take her hand off the throttle. Part of that drive is to maintain control and keep the cash flow coming in. Part of it is the fear that not doing so would make her irrelevant…but then she’s been fighting that battle since the beginning.

Since I’ve always known her as a comic first and foremost, I’m not certain just how many people perceive her more as the QVC hustler, the red carpet maniac or the poster child for plastic surgery. None of those are complimentary, but if  we learn anything from A Piece of Work it is that Joan will do just about anything for a paycheck. Of course, she sees it for what it is – a paycheck – and in fact the film opens with a shockingly vulgar routine about her daughter passing up just such an opportunity.

Through a combination of photos, clips and footage we get a high level overview of her career – the struggle to get started, the star-making opportunity with Johnny Carson (and the backlash when she launched her own show at Fox); her difficulties with and love for her family and how those ties both helped and hurt her chances. This isn’t a life arc, it was filmed as a year in the life, with anecdotes. While it’s done well, I was hoping for more focus on the backstory; certainly there are hundreds of people who could have provided recollections and insight. We do get a few talking heads, from Don Rickles and Kathy Griffin to staff and management people. Why so few?

Video: Official Movie Trailer

You’ll probably learn more about Joan Rivers by reading her books, but that’s her window. The documentarians neither canonize nor attack her, which allow you to see her insecurities as exactly what they are – fuel for the fire. Comedians have to deal with rejection every time they walk on stage. Rivers has dealt with so much throughout her life that it’s amazing she’s still in there punching. But then you see her take the stage, and it’s as if an appliance was suddenly plugged into a socket. She’s fearless and tireless, but most importantly, she’s funny.

Rivers is 77 years old, but her schedule would exhaust a soccer mom half her age. Her recent victory on Donald Trump’s boardroom reality show gave her some extensive network visibility, and a recent announcement has her starting a reality show with her daughter and grandson. This movie was nominated for Best Documentary by the Broadcast Critics and if the Academy follows suit with an Oscar nod, that’s another a couple of months of top rung publicity. There are some painful moments in the film dealing with loneliness and rejection (both personally and professionally); it would be nice to see her get the recognition she deserves and have her name once again be primarily associated with comedy.

Go see the film – but also go see the legend herself.

Official website for the film

Joan Rivers’ official website

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Awards Time Again

Tomorrow is December 1st, a date that wakes up even the most lethargic among us to signal that The End Is Near! Of the year, anyway.

And with the end of a calendar year starts the cycle or awards, lists and kudos as entertainment organizations pat themselves on the back and critics try to rewind and review the outstanding efforts of the past twelve months. Every year it seems like the award ceremonies multiply like rabbits. And while I respect and have interest in several of them, you can count the first tier on one hand. At the top is the Academy Awards, with the Golden Globes slightly behind. Slightly behind are the NY and LA Film Critics Association along with the biggest up-and-comer of recent years, the Independent Spirit Awards (which eschews the Titanics of the world and focuses on the smaller efforts).

No disrespect to the many other cities presenting awards, but NY and LA are the face cards in this deck, the honors that bring the biggest recognition and influence the voting for the aforementioned two majors. And someday soon the Online Film Critics Association will be just as important, because let’s face it – the print media is a shell of its former shell.

This year’s Oscars will be hosted by James Franco and Anne Hathaway, proving that even a veteran industry knows it has to market to a new generation. I would much prefer the humor and irreverence of Ricky Gervais or Eddie Izzard – even one final rodeo for Billy Crystal – but I’m sure the pair will do a decent job. But if anyone besides Jon Hamm hosts The Emmys, I will plotz.

For those of you who enjoy these ceremonies like I do, here’s a list of upcoming events starting with tonight’s list of nominees for the Independent Spirit Awards.

  • Nov. 30 Film Independent Spirit Award nominations announced
  • 

  • Dec. 1 Academy Awards official screen credits forms due
  • Dec. 2 National Board of Review announces winners
  • Dec. 3 British Independent Film Awards
  • Dec. 3 International Documentary Association Awards
  • Dec. 11 Boston Film Critics announces winners
  • Dec. 12 AFI honorees announced
  • Dec. 12 Los Angeles Film Critics Association announces winners
  • Dec. 13 New York Film Critics Circle announces winners
  • Dec. 13 Broadcast Film Critics Association nominations announced
  • Dec. 14 Golden Globe nominations announced
  • Dec. 14 San Diego Critics Association announces winners
  • Dec. 15 Toronto Critics Association announces winners
  • Dec. 16 Screen Actors Guild Award nominations announced
  • Dec. 18 Houston Critics Association winners announced
  • Dec. 19 Satellite Awards
  • Dec. 20 Chicago Critics Association winners announced
  • Jan. 3 Online Film Critics Society winners announced
  • Jan. 4 Producers Guild of America nominations
  • Jan. 4 Writers Guild of America nominations
  • Jan. 8 Palm Springs International Film Festival
  • Jan. 10 Directors Guild of America nominations announced
  • Jan. 11 National Board of Review ceremony
  • Jan. 14 BFCA Critics’ Choice Awards winners announced
  • Jan. 14 AFI Awards
  • Jan. 15 L.A. Film Critics Association Awards ceremony
  • Jan. 16 Golden Globe Awards
  • Jan. 18 BAFTA nominations announced
  • Jan. 22 Producers Guild Awards
  • Jan. 25 Oscar nominations announced
  • Jan. 27 Santa Barbara International Film Festival
  • Jan. 28 Visual Effects Society Awards
  • Jan. 29 Directors Guild of America Awards
  • Jan. 30 Screen Actors Guild Awards
  • Feb. 2 Costume Designers Guild Awards
  • Feb. 5 Writers Guild Awards
  • Feb. 5 Art Directors Guild Awards
  • Feb. 5 Annie Awards
  • Feb. 12 Scientific and Technical Awards Presentation
  • Feb. 13 BAFTAs
  • Feb. 26 Independent Spirit Awards
  • Feb. 26 NAACP Image Awards
  • Feb. 27 83rd Academy Awards (2011 Oscars)

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In Praise of Peter Sellers

Hard to believe that Peter Sellers died thirty years ago today.

Harder still to realize he was only fifty-four when he died.

Sellers crammed a few spectacular movie roles into a relatively short period of time; despite a thirty year career it’s easy to see the clumps of time where his initiative and the quality of the project intersected to make movie magic. Of course, his legacy also includes his tenure as a member of The Goon Show and even hit records ( some produced by George Martin!).

His early period includes some of my favorites – The Ladykillers (one of the great Alec Guinness comedies), The Mouse That Roared and I’m All Right Jack. But his  work with two famed directors cemented his legacy.

Stanley Kubrick first cast Sellers in a supporting role (Clare Quilty) in his version of Lolita, an opportunity that gave Sellers the freedom to improvise and use disguises. This mutually trusting relationship would blossom in the anti-war classic Dr. Strangelove where Sellers juggled three separate roles. The black comedy consistently places high atop the lists of the greatest films ever made, and Sellers’ performances within became part of the social fabric.

Blake Edwards’ movie The Pink Panther first introduced the bumbling Inspector Clouseau, one of the most famous comic characters in movie history. Sellers repeated the role in four additional films: A Shot In The Dark, The Return of The Pink Panther, The Pink Panther Strikes Again and (posthumously) Revenge Of The Pink Panther.

The combination of clever wordplay, outrageous slapstick gags and dunce-like attitude enabled Sellers to put the movie on his back and run; the plots were secondary (and in some cases, contradictory across scripts). Nominated for a Golden Globe in three of the Pink Panther films, he never won.

Video: Chief Inspector Jacques Clouseau

I thought one of his best performances was also one of his most restrained – Chance The Gardener (a/k/a/ Chauncey Gardiner) in 1979’s Being There. Whether you look upon that movie as a religious allegory, a fairy tale or a brilliant social satire – I think it’s all three – Sellers’ performance is almost inverted, as he allows everyone and everything to react to him.

Crazy? Or crazy like a fox? Sellers won the Golden Globe for his performance but didn’t win the Academy Award; he was nominated for Best Actor but lost to Dustin Hoffman for Kramer vs. Kramer.

Sellers was often quoted saying he did not know who he really was, that he lived through his characters and his artistic expression. If true, that’s a sad story, but supportive of many comedians who claim they have very little self-esteem. And when you crawl into someone else’s skin as often as Sellers did – and into such odd skin, at that – who’s to say he was exaggerating?

My pint glass raised to you today, Peter Sellers.

Peter Sellers filmography at IMDB.com

The Peter Sellers Appreciation Society

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Holmes knows Holmes

Great actor, bad idea

FICTION: Every time they remake Sherlock Holmes it gets better! 

The virtual ink was barely dry on the my recap of historical Sherlock Holmes movies when the new bombastic film hit theatres over the holidays. I don’t know about you, but when I think of the world’s greatest detective I don’t think of meticulous analysis of clues, a flawless observation of the human mind and an ability to anticipate the moves of even the most industrious adversaries. No…I think shirtless guys beating each other in cage matches, Rube Goldberg contraptions that even an over-the-top show like The Wild Wild West tossed aside as too absurd and shit blowing up real good

(Yes, that was satire.) 

I love Robert Downey Jr.’s acting skill; I’m still haunted by his stunning inhabitation of Charlie Chaplin and am happy that he’s seemingly pulled his ass out of the gutter at the final moment to resume what hopefully will be a long and storied career. But I hope he did this one for a pile of cash, because he just shat on a legacy, Golden Globe or not. (The fact that the movie was entered as a comedy should tell you all you need to know about its adherence to the Holmes legend). So on to the essay… 

Anytime a major fictional character is played by more than one person, endless discussions will ensue regarding which actor was the standard by which all others should be measured. Sean Connery’s charm and poise seems to have cemented his status as the ultimate James Bond, but when discussions turn to Scrooge, Alastair Sim’s dynamic performance is often undervalued because of the antiquity of A Christmas Carol both in age and condition. 

Later generations, more drawn to color film and special effects, tend to favor George C. Scott or Albert Finney. Likewise, when discussions turn to Sherlock Holmes, the quality and production of the more recent films featuring Jeremy Brett tend to tip the scales his way for many viewers. For as good as the films featuring Basil Rathbone as Sherlock Holmes might have been, the WWII era prints degenerated so much over the years that they became almost unwatchable. 

 

FACT: Basil Rathbone is the definitive Sherlock Holmes. 

Rathbone, who resembles the illustrations of Holmes from the original stories, plays up the character’s eccentricities and intelligence without flamboyance, although he will engage in physical activity in pursuit of justice. In fact, he’s occasionally reckless and often is within a whisker of a tragic move. Yet when at his best – face to face with an adversary, one mind battling another – it’s fascinating to watch him convey his superior intellect and chess-like manipulation without using physical gestures

Read the rest of my full review in PopMatters.

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