Tag Archives: Green Blimp

T.G.I.F. – Ten More Bridesmaids

You’ve seen the Top Ten for 2010, and the full list is still being whipped into shape, but there’s no harm tipping the cap to ten more albums that didn’t make the top of the list but were great purchases during the year. Some finished high on other lists – including one that straddled the top on many of them – while others can claim a handful of people like me in their fan club.

Huge followings don’t affect my barometer, nor does a lack of a visible fanbase make me think less of the artist. I like what I like; there’s no such thing as a guilty pleasure. Guilty pleasures are for cowards.

So here, in no particular order, are Ten More Bridesmaids to check out. Hopefully a few of these are already spinning repeatedly at your place too.

01) Manic Street Preachers – Postcards From A Young ManSome say they went commercial with their tenth album; I say they have one of their most irresistible collections of songs in years. Why are they not huge in the US?

02) Paul Collins – King of Power Pop. Maybe a slew of living room concerts inspired him to revisit his more energetic power pop side, and revisit his Beat days. The Flamin’ Groovies and Box Tops covers are icing on the pop cake.

03) Dwight Twilley – Green Blimp. The Man of A Thousand Comebacks makes yet another one, but Green Blimp is very much a return to form. You can almost hear him ripping himself off on these tracks, but in-house sampling is fine when it’s this good.

04) The Parting Gifts – Strychnine Dandelions. Greg Cartwright from Reigning Sound collaborating with Coco Hames of The Ettes, and I would have bounced it higher if Greg sang everything. Great guests including Dave Amels and Dan Auerbach, and the songs are stellar – of course.

05) Arcade Fire – The Suburbs. I like this album quite a bit, but not with the overwhelming fawning that it is getting across the board; I suspect it will finish atop this year’s Village Voice Poll (nah, they’ll cop out for Kanye West…). More of a consistent album than usual and it is growing on me.

06) Jason and the Scorchers – Halcyon Times. Dare I say it? The Scorchers are back. New rhythm section, but Jason Ringenberg sounds young and refreshed, and Warner Hodges is once again a guitar slinger to be bowed down to. Your move, Del Lords!.

07) Stereophonics – Keep Calm And Carry On. Another band that inexplicably doesn’t find success in America, and I’m dumfounded. Kelly Jones and crew just keep getting better and better; maybe one day we’ll catch up with the rest of the globe?

08) Locksley – Be In Love. Maybe it’s the reputation as a band for teens? Their second album is a big leap forward, stuffed with energetic, bouncy, dance-worthy pop songs and great vocals. Remember – no guilty pleasures!

09) Marah – Life Is A Problem. The sound of a band falling apart and being glued back together at the same time. Organic, loopy, rough, heartfelt, strange and exciting, it’s by turns depressing and magical; listening to it is like eavesdropping. I see light at the end of this tunnel.

10) Pernice Brothers – Goodbye Killer. Really, have these guys ever made anything less than a compelling album? Joe Pernice has to be one of the most under-appreciated songwriters around; here his gems echo everything from 60’s singles to late 20th century indie angst. Meant to be listened to cover to cover.

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Under The Radar: Dwight Twilley

In closing yesterday’s post about Dwight Twilley’s Kickstarter campaign for Green Blimp, I stated that despite the indifference of pop radio and the music industry in general, for veteran artists with a core following, every new album is another chance.

That led me to look back to what I wrote when Dwight’s last album of new material, 47 Moons, was released in 2005. Sure enough, I had the same tempered enthusiasm and cockeyed optimism. But I openly questioned the marketing and distribution plan for that album…and apparently rightfully so.

This time around, Twilley seems committed to a more conventional promotional campaign including radio station visits and shows in key markets (in addition to his viral online strategy). Hell, I don’t care what it takes – I just hope people get the opportunity to discover the album is out there and then listen to his music. Let the chips fall where they may at that point, which is all that an artist can really ask for.

Here’s my 2005 review of 47 Moons

I’ve been waiting years and several releases to be able to utter these words: DWIGHT TWILLEY IS BACK! I’ve enjoyed the past few collections and reissues and even the newer material, but somehow it was all a little bit lacking. Not anymore.

Twilley has long since abandoned the three-minute pop formula he used to dazzle us with. Songs now drift into the fifth minute with regularity, and the title track clocks in at close to seven. It’s as if he’s realized that the current radio sandbox doesn’t have room for him anyway, so why bother? Instead, he seems to have put his industry bitterness to the side and focused upon making some music from his heart. Great move Dwight: almost as good as making certain Bill Pitcock IV is a central part of the effort.

The results may not knock you out on a quick listen: there’s no “I’m On Fire” to be had here – but spin this two or three times and you cannot help but be won over. It’s not a perfect record; “To Wait Is To Waste” is bloated at six minutes long, an idea that never gets off the ground. And those in search of more electrifying material might want to skip through the midtempo “King Of The Mountain” or the synthetic “Chandra.” However, “Ice Captain” and the beautiful title track prove he can shine in that pace as well. Add five standout tracks that will captivate any classic Twilley fan – “Chance Of A Lifetime,” “Walkin’ On Water,” “Runaway With You,” “Better Watch Out” and the infectious “Jackie Naked In The Window” – and you can see why this record is destined for my Best of 2005 list next December.

Dwight Twilley has always had one of the great pop voices, and his harmonies with Phil Seymour still send chills up my spine. But even in the old days he could stack his own vocals with great results, and it’s great to hear him singing with passion again. And three cheers for Bill Pitcock, the little-known guitar whiz who added so much charm and texture to the classic Twilley catalogue. He’s in classic form bouncing notes off Twilley’s rockabilly-hiccup vocals in “Flippin” or playfully ripping off his own licks in “Runaway With You.” Still inventive on guitar and bass, still criminally unknown.

The real mystery to 47 Moons is the marketing and distribution. Digital Musicworks is a label dedicated to “distributing and promoting artists’ music exclusively through digital music stores.” That’s a nice credo, but an unproven business model for legacy artists who have a wider and older fanbase. Sure, there are those who will be happy to buy a track or even the album in a digital download format. But cutting out the physical market when the digital age is embryonic is a major, major mistake. And if you are, then why is it available as a standard CD on Amazon?

And if Amazon can sell it, why is it not yet available at online retailers like Not Lame who have supported his past efforts and cater to his audience, let alone independent record stores where his fans would likely shop? What kind of “promoting” and “distribution” is that? I had to scrounge to find a copy of the record and only knew about it because I periodically do a web-search for information about Twilley. I was also surprised to find a Christmas EP. If I’m struggling as a proactive fan, what about the casual audience who needs to be alerted? You’re a label with one of the brightest lights in power-pop history in your hands and you’re not making a big deal out of his new album?

This reminds me of a horror story from the past. Dwight Twilley’s career missed capitalizing on a meteoric start when his label (Shelter) couldn’t get Sincerely into stores despite massive airplay for the single (“I’m On Fire”) and a strong promotional buzz across the media landscape. By the time they finally did connect with the buying public, it was too late – the momentum was gone and so were the sales and dollars. I sure hope DMI isn’t about to make history repeat with the same colossal blunder.

Listen to clips of 47 Moons at Amazon

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Another Kickstarter: Dwight Twilley

 

Dwight Twilley is still making great music, and like many veteran artists who are ignored by radio and major labels, he’s doing it himself with a little help from his fans. In recent years Dwight has issued a number of rarities and covers albums which have both thrilled longtime followers and helped circumnavigate the industry bullshit and put some money into his pocket. 

Now in 2010, a brand new albumGreen Blimp

At this point the project goal has been surpassed, so any pledges will definitely be honored, but some interesting rewards for different purchase levels are still available. But even if you have signed up to buy the album elsewhere, you have to click on the Kickstarter site for this project and watch the video – it’s hilarious

Really excited to hear that there is a documentary film in the works as well. His is a story well worth telling, from early can’t miss status (and the fall of Shelter Records, which almost took out Tom Petty as well) to his award-winning book and recent DIY career revitalization. Anyone on board the Twilley parade knows that his hybrid Beatles/rockabilly vibe is irresistible, and songs like “I’m On Fire” are bonafide powerpop classics. 

Of course, there were also many bumps and bruises along the way, including the tragic death of his partner in musical crime, Phil Seymour. He’s had tremendous critical acclaim and periods of artistic anonymity, and although his catalogue speaks for itself, like many great artists, he’s unjustly underknown. 

But with every new album comes another chance

And if the leadoff track “Get Up” is any indication, Green Blimp will be a killer. Just knowing that Bill Pitcock IV is on guitar and Susan Cowsill is singing harmonies should be enough to get any Twilley fan salivating. 

Somewhere Phil Seymour is smiling. 

Rock Stars!

 Dwight Twilley website

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