Tag Archives: Hurley

Alcatraz! Hurley!!

If you read my column on Friday about my frustration with TV shows getting the quick hook, you’ll no doubt wonder why I’m a little geeked about Alcatraz. After all, a show about prison breaks, time travel and mysterious missions can’t survive, right? Otherwise I’d still be watching Life On Mars.

But this is J.J. Abrams we’re talking about, and the trailer for Alcatraz makes me think I can forgive him for Undercovers. If the network has any kind of patience – and if the show is as good as the trailer looks, of course – this one might slide alongside Fringe and Lost, a sweet spot that Abrams can hit with regularity. And unlike Lost, it appears the plot is already outlined:

Fox wanted to know what they were getting into, they did not want to get into a situation where it was a completely up-for-grabs scenario,” Abrams said. “They asked for the explanation of what’s going on to a large degree. Obviously they didn’t say, ‘Give us every script synopsis and tell us what happens in the series finale,’ but they wanted the main headlines of what the show is about, what the backstory is.” (Showrunner Elizabeth) Sarnoff wrote a document, which is obviously being kept secret from public eyes, explaining everything. Abrams says those revelations were “actually the key to getting the show on the air.” Producers will still be free to take detours and things could always change, but the fact that Alcatraz has a firm backstory — and one compelling and sensible enough to convince Fox to buy into the program — ought also reassure fans who get frustrated when they sense TV writers are completely winging it on serialized shows.

And it not only stars an always-creepy Sam Neill, but Jorge Garcia is back.

Hurley? On an island?

Good year for J.J..  –  see for yourself!

Video: Alcatraz Trailer.

Fingers crossed. And did I mention Hurley? One down, two to go.

I see dead people

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4,8,15,16…oh,crap!

People are still LOST.

Thousands of people still play the “cursed numbers” from the TV show Lost on a regular basis. On the show, Hugo Reyes Hurley to you and I – was obsessed with the numbers  4, 8, 15, 16, 23 and 42, having learned them from another inmate in the asylum he spent some time in. The numbers played a pivotal role in the show’s plot, including Hurley winning the lottery when all six numbers came up. Of course, Hurley’s win was followed by a continuous string of bad luck, bringing loss, death and destruction to him and those around him.

Yesterday over 26,000 people won $150 each simply by playing those same numbers. Four of the six numbers selected in the real-life $355-million lottery matched Hurley’s picks; the winning Mega Millions numbers were 4, 8, 15, 25, 47 and 42.

Jorge Garcia, the actor who played Hurley, has been bombarded by reporters. His girlfriend’s tweet is priceless:  “A tabloid news show just showed up at our FRONT DOOR hoping to get an intvw with Jorge about last night’s lotto #s. Is this really our life?

That part of the story is fun.

But didn’t a thousand birds just fall from the sky…twice? And hundreds of dead fish washed up on shore? And now thousands of dead crabs in England?

Coincidence? Or Apocalypse?

To paraphrase another classic TV series, “Let’s be careful out there“…

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Post-Emmy Thoughts

Visit the official Emmy website for a list of the winners.

  • Jimmy Fallon, you did great. That opening number will go down as one of the funniest and best kickoffs in the history of the telecast. You were funny throughout the night without being overbearing and milked that child-like innocence for all it was worth. And the musical impressions were pure gold.
  • Although I was pulling for Terry O’Quinn to be recognized for his incredible work on Lost, I can’t argue with the award to Aaron Paul from Breaking Bad. I felt he should have won before, and it’s great to see that his peers recognized his efforts; so many other actors would have made Jesse Pinkman a caricature.
  • Now that Bryan Cranston’s incredibly dramatic chops aren’t catching anyone off guard, I wonder how many will look back and realize just how much he deserved the award for his work on Malcolm In The Middle?
  • It looks like 30 Rock hit the wall across the board – the show and leads Tina Fey and Alec Baldwin were collecting statues like clockwork but all three got shut out last night. I wonder if people are taking that show for granted already?
  • Ricky Gervais proved again that every awards show needs to have him on stage for at least five minutes. Again, the funniest man in the room.
  • If you told me that two people would stand up in the audience and take bows, I never would have come up with Temple Grandin and Jack Kevorkian. Never.
  • Jorge Garcia and Jon Hamm during the “Born To Run” clip – priceless. (Hurley and Hamm does have a ring to it…)
  • Claire Danes is starting to resemble Lauren Bacall.
  • The Tweets sucked the life out of the moment anytime they were read. Dump the idea.
  • Mad Men is an unstoppable force. Ensembles do rule.
  • Tom Selleck looked like Gregory Peck in The Boys From Brazil.
  • Usually those songs played during the Memorium sequence can be pretty lame, but I thought Jewel did a nice job. Might actually be the best song I’ve heard from her in years (not that I’m actively listening…)
  • Some of the “we asked them this question” film clips were beyond painful, but the one with Steve Levitan and Christopher Lloyd mocking the Old Spice man on a horse commercial was genius.
  • Bucky Gunts!!
  • January Jones looked like a Christmas ornament. And I’ll bet any hetero man in the first three rows – assuming there were any – appreciated the view.
  • Archie Panjabi as Best Supporting Actress over Elisabeth Moss and Christina Hendricks?. Are you kidding me?
  • But the absolute MVP of the night has to go to John Hodgman, who did the hilarious voice-overs again this year. They were hysterical in their own right and make you realize just how stodgy and lame and unimaginative most award shows are. Too bad he couldn’t have scripted everything the presenters were told to say.

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Get LOST, Again

The Lost Supper

It’s about time. 

It’s time for LOST to put up or shut up, and hopefully it will be the former not the latter. The creators have insisted that they have had the endgame in place since the very first season, and with a negotiated timeline for these past couple of seasons, they have had the opportunity to structure the final path with great precision. Rarely has an episodic show been given that kind of leverage, but I will be the first to admit that they have earned the shot. 

I’m a bit skeptical that the endgame was that specificBen Linus, after all, was initially written as a marginal character. But Michael Emerson’s dynamic performance led to Ben not only getting more screen time but ultimately becoming arguably the central character on the show. So unless the creators simply transferred another character’s storyline onto Ben’s shoulders, an audible was clearly called somewhere in process. 

And I’m fine with that. After suffering through what happened on The X-Files, I’ve been far more skeptical when labyrinthine plots and conspiracy theories are at the center of a program, but it appears that Lost has weaved a pretty airtight mosaic of people and events. It’s amazing to watch early episodes and notice something in the background that resurfaces several episodes (or years later). The X-Files once had a brilliant alien conspiracy theory in place but didn’t invest in the continuity with the same diligence as the fans did, and eventually the logic contradicted itself. The show ultimately backed itself into a corner by presenting two scenarios that could not co-exist, and a loyal fan base was justifiably frustrated and disappointed when no resolution or explanation was delivered. You don’t want to invest that kind of time into anything and be left hanging. 

(Chicago Tribune’s three-part interview with the creators; Maureen Ryan was kind enough to also include a summary of information for those of you with short attention spans.)

And that’s what’s so fascinating about this show. There are people (like me) who have been in deep since the first episode, and others who bailed during the show’s mid-life who have comeback into the fold when the announcement was made that the full story would get to be aired to its conclusion. The excitement for the last season is palpable, from the fan blogs with simple theory posts to incredible websites dedicated to in-depth psychological character evaluations and doctorate-level theses on the symbolism and meaning of the show. The writers and creators of LOST have had the gauntlet thrown down, and they have eighteen hours to pull it off. 

Carlton Cuse and Damon Lindelof have gleefully dispensed tiny clues and hints over the years but are already throwing the caveat out there for the endgame.  Lindelof suggests that “Some people will think it’s enormously satisfying. Other people will think it’s not satisfying enough. It all depends on the way that you watch the show”. Hmmm… 

Will it be frustrating like The Sopranos, or perfect like The Shield? We’ll find out soon enough, but first things first. And don’t forget to tune in tomorrow as the final season starts. 

Wikipedia of Lost episodes. 

Lostpedia  

The Season Premiere is certain to cook up some Big Numbers

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