Tag Archives: Jeff Lynne

Do Ya (Feel Lucky, Punk)?

The Powerpop Criminals are at it again…

This time it’s a thematic album composed of rock and powerpop bands covering the classic Move song, “Do Ya“. One of the all-time classics, it’s been a favorite cover tune for a lot of bands with its off-kilter verbal cadence and its anthemic sing-along chorus. Hell, if you only know the words “do ya do ya want my love?” you’re already halfway there.

Video: “Do Ya” (The Move, studio version)

Although the song was first done by The Move, it was one of its spin-off bands that made it more famous – The Electric Light Orchestra, or as they are better known, ELO. I love The Move and Roy Wood, but Jeff Lynne made a much superior version with ELO.

Video: “Do Ya” (ELO, live version from Midnight Special)

Powerpop bands gravitate to this song like moths to a flame – chunky fat power chords, opportune for great background harmonies, and a stomping beat that has serviced every rock band since the invention of the third chord.

So click here!

Included in this compilation are versions by Jason Falkner, Matthew Sweet, Ace Frehley, Yo La Tengo and Todd Rundgren’s Utopia, the latter from the initial three-keyboard version of the band. (By the way, those first two albums – Utopia and Another Live – kick serious ass!)

And lest you think this is the first time someone came up with this idea, may I introduce you to the amazing Anna Borg, whose TallBoy Records issued an extended play clear vinyl single in 2002 with four bands covering the classic: Parallax Project, Kenny Howes and the Yeah, Linus of Hollywood and Einstein’s Sister. You can buy that here along with many other great releases (I highly recommend that Sugarplastic series of singles!)

So…do ya feel lucky, punk?

Do Ya?

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Blast From The Past: Liquor Giants

I guess writing about the closing of Not Lame sent me to the record racks for consolation. Grabbing a Liquor Giants disc is never a bad thing to do. Meaning to select Every Other Day At A Time, I accidentally grabbed the next disc in the rack, Something Special For The Kids. An audio Freudian slip? The latter disc was originally a series of hidden bonus tracks on some editions of EODAAT and was not released on its own until later that year.

When I wrote the review for TransAction Magazine in 1998, I couldn’t focus on the bonus tracks; it wasn’t a sure thing that they’d see the light of day. But it’s okay now! Hell, I love tributes and cover tunes, and Something Special For The Kids is loaded with them. Jeff Beck, The Move, The Turtles, Connie Francis (!), Dusty Springfield, Jeff Lynne…I’m sure they did it for fun and I’m glad they did.

And Every Other Day At A Time is no slouch either.

It’s almost Christmas! Go grab both of them.

Ward Dotson and company are at it again with perhaps their strongest effort to date.  Calling to mind The Byrds, The Plimsouls, Big Star, The Kinks and several other similar influences, their Replacements-like “sloppy but tight” sound worms its way into your heart very quickly.

Although “What’s The New Mofo” won’t get airplay (thanks to the well-enunciated long version of “mofo“), ringing guitars and heartfelt harmonies songs like “Dearest Darling” “Kentucky Lounge” and “Caroline” deserve serious air time. The promo copy includes eleven covers as bonus tracks (to be released as a separate disc later this year) and is capped by a tremendous cover of Bowie’s “Boys Keep Swinging”.

Everybody loves a clown

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Under The Radar: Sounds Like…?

My buddy Angelo over at Power Pop Criminals has done it again.

Angelo loves well done cover tunes as much as I do, and we probably share the same disappointment that record labels don’t often do a good job assembling tribute albums. PPC’s Beatle album recreations, for example, are works of art (literally – the cover art on their home-crafted mixes is always first-rate!). So like many of us do, Angelo makes mix tapes to compensate. Thankfully, he also offers them as a free download.

Last month also marked PPC’s fifth anniversarycongratulations!

Head on over to PPC. You’ll find a wealth of magic in the archives and hopefully discover a new favorite artist or two; hopefully your interest will turn into support via album purchases and concert tickets. I’ll bet you find a couple of new (to you) bands that will floor you in this collection.

Here are his words on the subject:

“I guess you all remember Dave Edmunds recreating the Phil Spector’s Wall Of Sound, or how many bands have contributed to the Beatlesque history of Power Pop and some other artists searching for the perfect harmonies of Brian Wilson, even The Fab Four did this with “Paperback Writer”. All those bands have something in common, the love and respect for these forerunners. So instead of covering some classic tunes, they wrote original songs, mixed and produced them in the spirit of the bands we all love.

This new 2CD PPC collection is my humble try at compiling the homages recorded by the bands featured here. Of course, some of you won’t hear what i’ve heard, but you won’t deny the L.E.O.’s song might be one of the best songs Jeff L. has never written, or that Marc B., Bob D., Elvis C. can be heard without being really featured. Some other acts have included partial references to their heroes – this is how Roy Wood’s Wizzard can be heard with some glitter stomp in the same song, i could write and on and on, but where would be the fun of discovering the  tributes hidden in the songs. Enjoy.”

Some Soundalikes is available at the PPC website.

 
 

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Tributes

I got a couple of emails from readers of yesterday’s post who were loving the Beatles cover comp and asking about tributes, since I’m on record as an obsessive fan of such efforts. On more than one occasion I’ve made my mixtape entry a covers collection (even pilfering a Replacements track title – I’LL BE YOU – for one of the more recent efforts) and I always love when I get them in return. (I’ll have to dig up that comp and post it here in the near future.)

I’ve found that the best ones are usually from independent projects on small labels where the scope will go outside the artist roster. By licensing tracks from other worthy bands that would appeal to the same audience as the internal ringers, the label is saying “we are putting the project first” rather than “this is a cheesey effort to get even the crappiest band on my roster some attention“. Frankly few of these get airplay anyway, so those weaker efforts just wind up in the band’s garage where they belong.

The major labels often blow it as well; too often their efforts wind up using big name artists that have no clue. Of course, with their overhead mapped against the unlikely hit potential, these are not frequent releases. But like the tiny labels trying to build around one good band with filler, the big boys have proven that they’re equally adept at creating a PLE (painful listening experience).

A list of the greatest tribute albums ever deserves more time and thought than I have to spare right now, but I do want to float out a couple of my favorites as well as clue you in to a little known collection assembled by a fellow blogger. These aren’t necessarily the five best, although my favorite tribute ever is included. 

Winner and still champion

Winner and still champion

SING HOLLIES IN REVERSE (eggBert): A majestic collection of power-pop artists including Bill Lloyd, Jon Brion, The Wondermints, Mitch Easter, Tommy Keene and Material Issue. Compiled by the late Greg Dwinnell, this was an all-hits no-misses effort where even the artwork and liner notes were first rate. Greg’s eggBert label also issued a wonderful Bee Gees tribute called MELODY FAIR that was almost as good.

Kovering the Klassics

Kovering the Klassics

THIS IS WHERE I BELONG (Rykodisc): Steve Forbert, Jonathan Richman, Bill Lloyd (the KING of tribute album appearances), Fastball, Fountains of Wayne, Cracker, Minus 5…a solid list of great commercial bands drawing from one of the Koolest Katalogues around. A little better than GIVE THE PEOPLE WHAT THEY WANT, which was released around the same time, although “Ring The Bells” by The Model Rockets from the latter might be the best cut of all. (If you can find a copy of SHANGRI-LA on Communion Records, that’s also highly recommended! (Note – if you listen to the Amazon clips, realize that the matchup of artist and song is incorrect).

Whipped Gum and Other Delights

Whipped Gum and Other Delights

RIGHT TO CHEWS (Not Lame): For the bubblegum pop listener in all of us, Not Lame’s impeccable release was complied by John Borack (longtime reviewer and author of Shake Some Action) and features some of the best artists in the current power-pop scene.  Great takes on The 1910 Fruitgum Company, The Ohio Express and Tommy Rowe by Michael Carpenter (genius) , Walter Clevenger (ditto), The Lolas and others. Not Lame has released several great tribute albums for artists as diverse as Gene Clark, Jeff Lynne/ELO and The Cars, among others; every one of them has several chestnuts worth roasting.

Bone Up on these great covers

Bone Up on these great covers

While you’re waiting foa any of the above to arrive in the mail, why not enjoy a great tribute mix right now? Angelo from Power Pop Criminals assembled these brilliant cover comps that are available as free downloads. And on that same page, the excellent rarity and out-of-print Bobby Fuller Four tribute OUR FAVORITE TEXAN.

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Happy Birthday, Dave Edmunds

I *still* hear you rockin'...

I *still* hear you rockin'...

How can one be famous and critically underrated at the same time? Although Dave Edmunds has had hits with his band Love Sculpture, as a member of super-group (to the smart ones among us, anyway) Rockpile and as a solo artist, he rarely gets mentioned on lists of the greatest guitar players ever to sling an axe over their shoulder. If you doubt me, may I suggest a run through his catalogue?

I was first floored by his manic playing on “Sabre Dance” and the template for drunken sing-alongs, “I Hear You Knockin“, but the magic ran much deeper on his albums. Always a great cover artist (his take on “Girls Talk” trumps Elvis Costello,  hands down), he breathed new life into songs from both influences and contemporaries. A skilled writer, producer and multi-instrumentalist, Edmunds combined his love of Phil Spector’s production techniques, classic pop song structure, doo-wop harmonies, rockabilly and country twang to forge infectious and irresistible music. His version of “Let It Be Me” was so heartfelt and beautiful that I asked a pair of Flashcubes to perform it at my wedding (thanks Gary and Artie), their equally powerful version had people openly weeping. (At least I think that’s why the attendees were crying…). Check out “Baby I Love You” and “Born To Be With You” , two tracks that recall the positive side of the Phil Spector story.

Axe Murderer

Axe Murderer

Later in the 70s, he and Nick Lowe eventually formed Rockpile with Billy Bremner and Terry Williams, but before, during and after they alternated backing each other on solo albums. Although Seconds of Pleasure is the only official Rockpile release, there’s really an entire catalogue of albums featuring most of the same musicians. Nick and Dave brought the best out in each other, and although they supposedly fought like cats and dogs, the sum of the parts was as good as the individual pieces. If you’re not familiar with that era, correct that mistake soon.

Rockpile plays “Sweet Little Lisa“.

Dave’s solo records were strong and featured the occasional hit, but he still wasn’t on that A-list in sales of popularity (although critically, he was doing just fine). When he signed a management contract with a powerful East Coast promoter in the mid-80s, I thought he would finally get the huge push he needed to become the household name he deserved to be. Instead, it was as if he went on a sabbatical, as his live appearances and recorded output slowed to a crawl. Thankfully he shared his talents with others behind the scenes.

Edmunds found a kindred spirit in Brian Setzer and produced The Stray Cats, who instantly became a phenomenon. Once again he leaned upon his early organic influences and was able to showcase the band in their best light – crisp and clear. A similar effort led to great success for The Fabulous Thunderbirds. It still mystifies me why he later leaned upon Jeff Lynne to produce his own work (well, not completely mystified – I’m sure the label told him they needed a hit record) since tracks from that era sound as dated as…well…as Jeff Lynne. (If Lynne really wanted to do Edmunds a favor, he would have declined the spot in the Traveling Wilburys and let Dave play like James Burton and Scotty Moore.)

Almost invisibly, Edmunds released a couple of great albums late in his career. In the mid-90s, Plugged In returned him to his all-by-myself early days and proved he had lost nothing, even showcasing one of the best Beach Boy homages ever recorded. Then in 2001, he hooked up with The Refreshments – the Swedish band, not the Arizona guys who want to “divvy up there“) – and released A Pile of Rock Live. Word to the curious –  The Refreshments are the closest thing you will find to vintage Rockpile and in this incarnation featured Billy Bremner and Geraint Watkins. The album is stunning, and any Edmunds/Bremner/Rockpile fan should check out their entire catalogue. (And pick up those Billy Bremner albums while you’re at it…speaking of underrated artists!).

Lately Dave has only been making spot appearances, and his newest album is another collection rather than new material. Hopefully he will get the itch again soon and grace us with more magic. But even if he never recorded another note, his musical legacy is firmly established as one of the greats.

Dave and The Refreshments play “I Knew The Bride“.

Dave and Graham Parker go “Crawling Through The Wreckage

Visit the official Dave Edmunds website.

Happy Birthday, Dave!!!

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