Tag Archives: Parks & Recreation

TV *and* Not TV!

A crapshoot usually results in…crap.

We’re at the cusp of some major decision-making at the major television networks. Although a few things have leaked out already, the upfronts which are scheduled for the next couple of days will find ABC, NBC, FOX, CBS and others setting the stage for their Fall 2010 programming. Sometimes it’s not so much what they say as what they don’t say.

For example, you’re unlikely to see a formal announcement confirming Better off Ted is cancelled. But when you look at the ABC schedule, it won’t be there. Sayonara, genius comedy show.

This season sees a few iconic shows come to an end. Law and Order, tied for the longest-running night-time drama program ever, just got its walking papers…yet the network picked up Law and Order Los Angeles (or as Ray Davies and I like to call it, LOLA!). Soon the entire network will be L&O, CSI and NCIS. If you don’t like acronym drama, TFB – you’re SOL.

Lost is ramping up to its final weekend with an episode this Tuesday, some recaps on the weekend and then a two and a half hour finale on Sunday May 23rd. The next night, 24 will sign off its final season with a two-hour show before Jack Bauer and company undoubtedly head for the big screen.

Heroes has bitten the dust, although there will be a 2-4 hour special to hopefully wrap up all the plotlines. No such luck for FlashForward (which I still think would have made a nice lead in to V, which did get renewed), and Happy Town is apparently already slated to burn off and die in the summer. So much for novel ideas. Bring on the cop shows and medical dramas; America can’t get enough of people in uniforms. Even those who snog their co-workers.

Even the smaller cable networks are dicing and splicing. The once highly promoted Sarah Silverman Program has gotten the axe from Comedy Central, and Justified might be on life support at FX.

Thankfully, some quality dramas (Fringe, Castle) and comedies (Parks & Recreation, Community) survived their initial spotty ratings long enough to build a following and gain renewal. Others likely to get renewed defy all logic.

It will be an interesting week – each network has a long-standing favorite leaving the air, and NBC’s Jay Leno Show disaster leaves them with a gaping hole to fill (Parenthood is weak and The Marriage Ref is horrid, but any port in a storm, yes?). Be sure to follow the upfronts here at TV By The Numbers.

Or Entertainment Weekly’s Bubble Show Scorecard.

***

Some people get so frustrated, they want to blow up their television.

Now you’re talking!

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TV or not TV? That’s always the question…

Hey you! PUT DOWN THAT REMOTE!

Hey you! PUT DOWN THAT REMOTE!

I don’t really have that much time to watch television, nor have there been many recent shows that have me glued to the screen. And that’s probably a good thing. People (especially here in America) spend far too much time sitting in a chair mesmerized by the Idiot Box. The networks have increasingly offered to meet us more than halfway by offering such a slate of vapid, soulless programming that one would have thought they were trying to clear the room, not build an audience. But what’ s that famous quote?

“No one ever went broke underestimating the intelligence of the American public.”

Ah, yes, H.L. Mencken. Touché, sir. Talent shows controlled by massive ego-maniacal D-listers. Balding rockers swapping spit with living, breathing breast implant shelves. Overly dramatic game shows. Embarrassing confessional group therapy hosted by people with only first names. Celebretards basking in their shallow celebretard lives. And yet America laps it up like a starved pack of feral monkeys. (I’m not certain that feral monkeys would ever be that hungry, but I like the way that sentence rolls off the tongue. Back to my story…)

Of course, if anything does work, the networks are quick to clone it ad nauseum. We’re probably a season or two away from CSI: Little Rock and Law And Order: Traffic Scofflaw, but if we keep buying, they’ll keep selling. However, I have found a few new moments of fun amid all the hospital sleepover camp dramas and the hyperbolic news magazine exposes. But one is already dead, and the future doesn’t look bright for the others. So tune in quick!

 

fringe-tv

Fringe, like The X-Files, combines elements of both science fiction and cop shows, and has an appealingly quirky lead actress paired with a sarcastic and smart partner. I thought they went way over the top with the character of Walter, who interrupts normal conversations with childlike tangential observations, but John Noble has brought great sympathy and depth to a character who could have easily been a cartoon. The cast is first-rate, the Outer Limits plots surreal, and it looks great. Definitely one where you want to revisit all the season’s episodes once more prior to the finale.

castle-tv

Castle initially looked like the bastard child of Moonlighting and Murder She Wrote, but it’s growing on me week by week. Yes, the female detective is by-the-book (and smokin’ hot) and the charming newcomer is a wise-ass with a brain behind the clown facade. A good supporting cast that’s underused, with one exception. Susan Sullivan is a fine actress and probably a nice person, but her “Mom” character needs to fall down an elevator shaft ASAP – the show stops dead in its tracks when her character is in focus. Good chemistry between the leads and a smart kid who seems like a normal kid, not a prop.

better-off-ted-tv

Better Off Ted was initially very disappointing; perhaps I was underwhelmed after all the hype (I tend to do that) or maybe the first episode just wasn’t that funny. But I stuck with it because the jokes that were working were so sly and the dialogue delivered so dryly that I hoped they were just finding their voice. I’m glad I did – the last couple of episodes were not only hilarious but politically incorrect. Many critics compare the show to Arrested Development, and while I think fans of one will like the other, this show – hell, any show – has a long hill to climb to get to that level. But the writing is great (creator Victor Fresco was also behind Andy Richter Controls The Universe) and the cast is perfect; I hope they give it time to grow. (Bonus: The Veridian Dynamic commercials are killer!)

parks-and-recreation-tv

Parks and Recreation will sink or swim on Amy Poehler’s efforts, and she is one comedienne who is unafraid to make a complete fool of herself in the process. But the supporting cast is also strong, especially Aziz Ansari as her self-serving peer in the department office. Shot in the same mockumentary style as The Office – and slotted immediately prior to it on the schedule – it should appeal to the same audience if it can somehow make an uncommon setting seem familiar to viewers. I suspect we’ll meet the oddballs of the town (read: star cameos) to help boost interest. Looks like it has potential, has been very funny in spots.

life_on_mars-tv

I already waxed poetic about Life On Mars in an earlier post, so I won’t rehash that here. I just hope there is a DVD complete with the brilliant musical selections that helped make the show as enjoyable as the acting and plot. Obviously not many people saw it the first time around, so if that was you, don’t mess up twice.

Most of the above shows have episodes available online – check them out when you have a chance. I’ll have thoughts on my favorite returning shows of the season and my biggest disappointments in an upcoming blog.

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