Tag Archives: Santana

Glee Whiz

Not with a bang, but a whimper…

I should have known better than to have been too jazzed to see the cast of Glee take on Rocky Horror. Like many, I fell for the promo clips and well-distributed cast photos and falsely assumed that they would really take a…um…bite out of the classic musical. And when the show opened with those lips and almost a full take on “Dammit Janet“, I thought maybe they were going to really pull out the stops this time. It’s not like there is a shortage of great songs in that show – hell, they’re all great.

But sadly, the sappy melodrama that is Mr. Schuester dragged the whole thing down into the mess that is his character’s personal life. I’m not certain what the motivation is behind that character arc, but what was once a sympathetic and likeable character has quickly become a wimp, a loser, and finally, a cad. If they’re trying to tell us that even an adult can suffer like a high school student, stop – we get it. Lately when Jane Lynch isn’t shredding the room with her Sue Sylvester quips, there are only two reasons to watch the show these days, and they’re named Kurt and Brittany. Chris Colfer and Heather Morris never fail to hit it out of the park. More of them, please, before it’s too late.

Frankly, the best moment of the night was having the camera pan past Barry Bostwick and MeatLoaf (for those who don’t know, they played Brad and Eddie in the film). A more courageous show would have left it right there, a perfect sight gag, much like the camera panning by The Three Stooges in fireman gear in It’s A Mad Mad Mad Mad World. Instead they tried to milk it in a follow-up scene where they played soulless network execs trying to stir controversy out of the production. Amusing, yes, but an overplayed hand.

Not that the casting matchups were bad. Lea Michele aped Susan Sarandon’s voice (as opposed to her usual Streisand channeling) but was overshadowed by Cory Monteith’s dorky take on Brad (not far from his Finn character). Chord Overstreet (yes, that’s a real name) looks so much like the original Rocky character it’s as if he was hired just for this episode.

In the line of the night, Artie suggests that he plays “the guy in the wheelchair”, and John Stamos even got to wear his Elvis “Comeback Special” catsuit and belt out “Hot Patootie” (in B flat, mind you!). And while Amber Riley (Mercedes) flexed her always-great pipes on “Sweet Transvestite”, the modernization of the song (let alone the neutered lyrics) fell flat.

Overall the ensemble did a nice job on “Time Warp”, with Santana and Brittany frighteningly well cast as Magenta and Columbia, and Kurt finally got to flaunt a little Riff Raff. But did we really need the downright creepy scene between Scheuster and Emma in place of remakes of classic scenes from the film, let alone full versions of the songs? Not only was it completely out of character for Emma to behave as she did, but thanks to that lame subplot we never got to hear “Rose Tint My World” or “Eddie” or “I’m Going Home”. (Remember, the rule is more Kurt and Brittany…)

So a couple of bright spots, but mostly underwhelming. Hey, if they could suck it up and go to the wall for Madonna, they could have paid just as much respect to Rocky Horror. Just sayin’.

Lesson learned again – like most times, stick with the originals. And if you can’t do that…well. it’s midnight somewhere – get thee to a theatre!

The Rocky Horror ShowOriginal cast soundtrack

Rocky Horror Picture ShowOriginal film soundtrack

Yes, that was Santana.

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T.G.I.F. – Ten Rockin’ Recollections

I can’t really listen to the radio anymore.

Stations today pretty much suck. Much like chain store record department employees, most on-air people are out of their depth. They don’t have a good grasp of what they’re trying to sell or present. They aren’t lifers. They don’t live and breathe the music. Perhaps that has a lot to do with the fact that they’re not choosing what to play (or in the case of the chain store clerk, they are not there by choice but promoted from the small appliances department).

Oldies radio recycles the same few hits by the same few bands and never play the chestnuts. Hell, most of these stations are farmed in from a few central syndicates anyway, so the concept of a revisiting a regional classic is pretty much gone. Some consultant somewhere is choosing titles from a list of what their contractual rights enable them to play without paying additional royalties. It’s dull, lifeless, repetitive.

Oh, I know there are exceptions. There are a couple of guys in my town who have an occasional 3-4 hour slot that can be very entertaining, but the airtime doesn’t line up with my schedule. And maybe satellite radio would cure me of this low opinion; one listen to someone like Little Steven and you see what a world of difference it makes when the creator of the show is deeply invested in every song and detail. Like a great mixtape, each song brings a nod and a smile; it’s great when you’re on that wavelength.

But I don’t need radio anymore. It hasn’t been able to teach me anything in years…decades, perhaps. But I have a lifetime of music to draw upon, and a continuing pipeline of great music that real artists continue to make regardless of apathy, challenges and obstacles. Bless you, fellow zealots.

S0 this week I present you with ten rockin’ recollections, ten songs that I thought of while daydreaming this morning. There’s no logical sequence, it isn’t a mix, and although the thrust of it hovers in the 70s, it wasn’t by design. Just ten great songs that you’ll probably never hear on the radio, but they put a smile on my face and I hope they put a smile on yours.

Enjoy the weekend!

Graham Parker: “Temporary Beauty“. Nice live version from a guy who has been making one brilliant album after another for thirty-five years; he doesn’t get anywhere near the credit he deserves.

Santana: “Soul Sacrifice“. Michael Shrieve is mindblowing on drums; Santana wowed everybody at WoodstockShrieve, at twenty, looked like Sid Vicious!

The Cruzados: “Bed Of Lies“. Vastly underrated band who had a couple of excellent records in the 80s; even Dylan is a fan. This and “Motorcycle Girl” were my faves.

John Hiatt and Matthew Sweet): “Girlfriend“. From Vh-1 Duets. You know, back when music stations actually programmed music content? They also covered “I Wanna Be Sedated” that night!

? and the Mysterians: “Do Something To Me“. Garage gods! This song wasn’t a hit for them although Tommy James had success with it. They still sound great today.

Edgar Winter Group: “Queen of My DreamsDan Hartman goes all Led Zeppelin on us. He was the soul of this group and an incredible talent.

Montrose: “Bad Motor Scooter“. Still smokes 36 years later. Sammy had poodle hair, Ronnie Montrose left Edgar Winter after “Frankenstein”.

J. Geils Band: “Lookin’ For a Love“. Best. Party. Band. Ever. Saw a clip of them from a recent reunion and Peter Wolf can still work that stage like a scarecrow jacked up on coke.

Van Duren: “Grow Yourself Up“. Underknown pop giant who was part of the Memphis scene circa Big Star and came up to Connecticut to record at Big Sound Records. New album in 2010.

Johnny Winter: “Jumping Jack Flash“. With Floyd Radford and Randy Jo Hobbs, although they’re just hanging on for dear life. Johnny owns this song!

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