Tag Archives: SCTV

Second City, Twice

It’s probably just a coincidence that Eli and I were talking about SCTV the other day, because she had no way of knowing I had just picked up a couple of books about The Second City (one about the history of the theatre; the other about the television show).

I hadn’t planned on reporting for Jury Duty on the first day of Summer, but having been through the drill before I knew that I’d probably have to kill a little bit of time. As it turned out, it was a good thing I brought both books.

The first was one I had read before, an insider’s recollection by Dave Thomas about the show, the cast, and how it all came together called SCTV Behind The Scenes. Thomas weaves personal observations with interviews with others into an engaging narrative about the origins of the program as well as the camaraderie – and sometimes rivalries – between the cast members. In doing so he is unflinchingly honest about his own myopia and drive which sometimes placed him at odds with fellow actors and staff while trying to put the show first.

There’s a lot of inside peeks at the process of turning writing sessions into post-produced pieces for air; how despite comparisons to Saturday Night Live the shows were really apples and oranges; how dedicated behind-the-scenes people from makeup artists to producers were usually in way over their head but delivered anyway. Despite the incredible difficulties involved in staging and (mostly) selling the show, their ability to self-create in a vacuum without regard for ratings or network input led to what most of them consider the artistic peak of their careers.

Behind The Scenes is already fifteen years old but still a wonderful read and a must for any SCTV fan. It’s a vivid reminder of how blessed we were to have a company with such creative minds cranking out truly original material. There’s a great essay from Conan O’Brien where he describes the impact the show had upon him. He felt for the first time that a comedy program was speaking directly to him while refusing to dumb it down for the masses; it was a logic that he would carry forward and use in his own career. (And his story about first meeting John Candy is both funny and a heart-warming tribute to both men.)

Unscripted, written by Mike Thomas (A Chicago journalist, no apparent relation to Dave) is a 2009 book that presents a fascinating history of the Second City theatre framed within quotes from its creators and participants. Although the Chicago side of the story dominates – as it should – Thomas pays great tribute to the Toronto establishment and sheds light on the many road shows and other city-based affiliates.

If you’ve read Live From New York by Tom Shales and James Andrew Miller – among the best tomes on Saturday Night Live – you’ll be familiar with the structure that Unscripted utilizes. Both authors conducted a bevy of interviews and weave quotes and anecdotes from the insiders to tell a chronological story. It’s an effective technique – as if a group of famous people are gathered in one room and they decided to tell you the history of their theatre in a round-robin format.

And we’re talking famous people.  A fifty year history, from early stars like Alan Arkin,  David Steinberg and Robert Klein to the recent TV pipeline of comedians Tina Fey, Steve Carell and Stephen Colbert. Most of the better cast members from Saturday Night Live. Ensembles from classic sitcoms from Cheers to 30 Rock. Actors like Peter Boyle. Stand-up comics like Joan Rivers. Of course, many will gravitate towards the bittersweet stories of the departed legends John Belushi, Chris Farley, and John Candy as well as famous stars like Bill Murray and Mike Myers who parlayed their improv training into huge careers. The list of Second City alumni is daunting.

But Thomas also lets us get to know about important innovators like Del Close, Bernard Salkins, Andrew Alexander and Joyce Sloan, whose work behind the scenes saved the company many times over. It’s great storytelling, albeit using the words of others. I laughed out loud several times, caught up in everything from great backstage anecdotes to quotes that just killed me. (My favorite – one performer recalling that a sketch bombed so badly “you could hear a mouse shit!”)

It’s fun to read about Second City and its history, but it’s great to know we can take in a live performance and revisit the brilliant television show on DVD.

Info about Unscripted at the Mike Thomas webpage.

Dave Thomas Wiki page

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T.G.I.F. – Ten SCTV Skits

SCTV is on the air!

I was discussing a certain popular television show with a friend when I realized I described a character’s demise as having “blowed up real good“. And just like that, we were off on a tangent, talking about all the great SCTV characters and skits we had enjoyed over the years, and what a great and eclectic cast SCTV had. Guy Caballero, Count Floyd, Edith Prickley, Ed Grimley, Sammy Maudlin, Bob and Doug McKenzie, Bobby Bittman, Jackie Rogers Jr., The Shmenge Brothers…an endless parade of weird and wonderful Melonville mania. 

Video: Celebrity Blow Up on The Farm Report 

There’s a whole lot more to Second City than the television show, of course; it has a storied history as one of the greatest comic workshops of all time. Many, many famous people have walked those stages, and the genesis of Saturday Night Live was a direct result of that factory. 

Here’s a great book that you can get used for as low as fifteen cents plus shipping! And of course I’ve touted Jeffrey Sweet’s book  Something Wonderful Right Away in these pages before. 

I’m thrilled that so many comedy troupes and improv companies started getting the respect they deserve, from The Kids In The Hall to Upright Citizen’s Brigade, but I am also a firm believe that we should always remember those who helped blaze the trail. 

So here are ten SCTV skits that show the wide bandwidth of appeal the show had – what a wonderful combination of parody, impressions and out-of-their-mind sketches, all tied back to the central theme of the television station. It would take far too long to go back and re-think what my top ten favorites are, so just take these as a quick sampler rather than a rated list. The SCTV  DVDs are available at very reasonable prices and they will give you years of smiles. 

 

01The Queen Haters on Mel’s Rockpile 

02Half Wits. A classic game show parody. 

03The Happy Wanderers, Yosh and Stan Shmenge 

04Orson Welles films a commercial with Liberace

05The Great White North – mouse in a beer bottle. 

 

06Perry Como, Still Alive 

07Jerry Lewis sings Bob Dylan

08Ricardo Montalban School of Fine Acting 

09 Count Floyd and his Scary Stories 

10Battle of the PBS Stars 

 

More great history at the SCTV Guide pages 

SCTV.org also has some info you’ll enjoy 

Another book: SCTV Episode Guide 

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PPC-TV is On The Air!

Point your antenna to Heaven

Point your antenna to Heaven

Sure, that came rolling out of my mouth a little easier because I was a loyal and dedicated SCTV fan. And just like that fictional program operated on the fringes of society, so too does PPC-TV.

I’ve turned you on to the amazing Angelo before when I posted links to his amazing Beatles tribute discs – the ones he reassembled album by album, track by track, to match the Fab Four canon. So it’s a given he’s a pop lover.

He’s now decided to share a wealth of amazing video clips from a plethora of sources like tapes of old Musikladen programs, French variety shows, and random promotional videos. With PPC-TV he’s launched what I hope is the start of an incredible potpourri of musical manna from Internet heaven – something for everyone.

Lesser known powerpop like Silver Sun and Dom Mariani? Check.

Old pub rock like Dr. Feelgood and Kursaal Flyers? Yep.

Vibrant video from Dramarama, The Gigolo Aunts and Flamin’ Groovies? You got it!

Need an injection of Buzzcocks and Ramones to kickstart your heart? No problem!

It’s the weekend! Turn on, Tune in, and Drop Out

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For Whom the Del Tolled

Whose yer daddy? (Apparently, he was...)

Whose yer daddy? (Apparently, he was...)

Good weekend for reading.  I just finished Kim Johnsons‘s excellent book The Funniest One In The Room about the life of Del Close, a legend of the improv theatre world. Pretty much any American comic working the edges today can be traced back to his influence, along with that of Paul Sills and Viola Spolin (Sills’ mother), and the long form model known as The Harold.  In tandem with the early Brirtish movement, his work also impacted landmark television shows like SNL, SCTV, MAD TV, Mr. Show, Whose Line Is It Anyway and others. Close died ten years ago; his influence will probably be eternal.

Johnson, who was a student of Close, was somehow able to stitch together a story about an unconventional man’s life, weaving a narrative out of the fact, fiction and legends like a person would pan for gold. I didn’t know the man personally, but when you read the testimonials from comedians who praise the book, you’ll go on faith like I did. It’s well-written, peppered with wonderful anecdotes, and a great peek behind the comedy curtain.

Here are just some of the groups that Close impacted as either an actor, writer, director or influence – the list of famous names who have interned through them is staggering:

I’ve read a few good books on the history of comedy over the last few years. I’ll save that overview for another day, but rest assured this title will be on the list – highly recommended for any fan of the genre.

The man willed his skull to the Goodman Theatre for their next presentation of Hamlet. Need I say more?

 skull

Truth In Comedy – a book Close co-authored with Johnson and Charna Halpern.

Del Close Wikipedia page.

Serendipity! Looks like the two comedy albums Del made are set for re-release in July.

I Am The Skull of Del Close

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