Tag Archives: The Move

New Album! Hans Rotenberry and Brad Jones

New to you, anyway – it came out last Fall.

But what has hit the street is the new issue of Bucketful of Brains, the great UK pop mag that has defied the odds and the decline of print journalism. Still going strong, still published on schedule, and still a place I’m proud to hang my keyboard each issue. Click here to find out more.

That’s where you’ll find my review of Mountain Jack, the album from Hans Rotenberry and Brad Jones. Any powerpop fan hearing those two names would instantly get excited; Hans has led the great band Shazam for years and Brad Jones is one of the great pop producers of our time as well as a solid artist in his own right. And while the collaboration might sound different than you would expect, it hits many of the right buttons.

Here’s my review…

Video: “A Likely Lad

Having produced four of the Shazam albums, Brad Jones knows every feint and jab that Hans Rotenberry has in his repertoire. So the pairing of bandleader and producer sounds much like you’d expect, a collaboration that draws heavily upon chunky rhythms, clever (but sometimes obtuse) lyrics and tight harmonies – not to mention song structure that draws heavily upon The Move and early Todd Rundgren. It’s a welcome return for Brad Jones, the powerpop producer who dropped the brilliant Gilt Flake on us many years ago and then dropped back out of sight like a February groundhog.

Those expecting the amp-cranking sound that the Shazam is famous for might be taken aback by the predominantly acoustic format, let alone songs like “Froggie Mountain Shakedown”. But the Americana-cum-powerpop formula suits the pair well; it’s loose and fun, and there’s enough cowbell to balance out the mouth harp. With “Count On Me”, “Likely Lad” and “It Would Not Be Uncool” they have three hit singles at my house, and hell, “Greef” is an Exile on Main Street doppelgänger as much as “Back To Bristol” recalls Alex Chilton. Take the plunge.

Mountain Jack at 50ft Records

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Do Ya (Feel Lucky, Punk)?

The Powerpop Criminals are at it again…

This time it’s a thematic album composed of rock and powerpop bands covering the classic Move song, “Do Ya“. One of the all-time classics, it’s been a favorite cover tune for a lot of bands with its off-kilter verbal cadence and its anthemic sing-along chorus. Hell, if you only know the words “do ya do ya want my love?” you’re already halfway there.

Video: “Do Ya” (The Move, studio version)

Although the song was first done by The Move, it was one of its spin-off bands that made it more famous – The Electric Light Orchestra, or as they are better known, ELO. I love The Move and Roy Wood, but Jeff Lynne made a much superior version with ELO.

Video: “Do Ya” (ELO, live version from Midnight Special)

Powerpop bands gravitate to this song like moths to a flame – chunky fat power chords, opportune for great background harmonies, and a stomping beat that has serviced every rock band since the invention of the third chord.

So click here!

Included in this compilation are versions by Jason Falkner, Matthew Sweet, Ace Frehley, Yo La Tengo and Todd Rundgren’s Utopia, the latter from the initial three-keyboard version of the band. (By the way, those first two albums – Utopia and Another Live – kick serious ass!)

And lest you think this is the first time someone came up with this idea, may I introduce you to the amazing Anna Borg, whose TallBoy Records issued an extended play clear vinyl single in 2002 with four bands covering the classic: Parallax Project, Kenny Howes and the Yeah, Linus of Hollywood and Einstein’s Sister. You can buy that here along with many other great releases (I highly recommend that Sugarplastic series of singles!)

So…do ya feel lucky, punk?

Do Ya?

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Blast From The Past: Liquor Giants

I guess writing about the closing of Not Lame sent me to the record racks for consolation. Grabbing a Liquor Giants disc is never a bad thing to do. Meaning to select Every Other Day At A Time, I accidentally grabbed the next disc in the rack, Something Special For The Kids. An audio Freudian slip? The latter disc was originally a series of hidden bonus tracks on some editions of EODAAT and was not released on its own until later that year.

When I wrote the review for TransAction Magazine in 1998, I couldn’t focus on the bonus tracks; it wasn’t a sure thing that they’d see the light of day. But it’s okay now! Hell, I love tributes and cover tunes, and Something Special For The Kids is loaded with them. Jeff Beck, The Move, The Turtles, Connie Francis (!), Dusty Springfield, Jeff Lynne…I’m sure they did it for fun and I’m glad they did.

And Every Other Day At A Time is no slouch either.

It’s almost Christmas! Go grab both of them.

Ward Dotson and company are at it again with perhaps their strongest effort to date.  Calling to mind The Byrds, The Plimsouls, Big Star, The Kinks and several other similar influences, their Replacements-like “sloppy but tight” sound worms its way into your heart very quickly.

Although “What’s The New Mofo” won’t get airplay (thanks to the well-enunciated long version of “mofo“), ringing guitars and heartfelt harmonies songs like “Dearest Darling” “Kentucky Lounge” and “Caroline” deserve serious air time. The promo copy includes eleven covers as bonus tracks (to be released as a separate disc later this year) and is capped by a tremendous cover of Bowie’s “Boys Keep Swinging”.

Everybody loves a clown

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New Album! The Shazam

Meteor? Or "meatier"?

Meteor? Or "meatier"?

The Shazam is back with their first studio album in several years!

Still mining the cave of The Who, The Move, Cheap Trick and similar crunchy power pop rockers, the speakers are rattling the moment the virtual needle drops on the opening cut “So Awesome”.

Fans of the band will no doubt be delighted by the sonic assault that is most of Meteor. I still think their self-titled debut and Godspeed The Shazam are their best work, but there are certainly moments here that shine brightly. Your mileage may vary. Read my full review at BLURT.

The Shazam

Sorta video for “So Awesome”

The Shazam website.

The Shazam on MySpace.

Not Lame Recordings.

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NEW ALBUM! Slingsby Hornets: Whatever Happened To…

Pollen Pop?

Pollen Pop?

Slingsby Aviation built some of the world’s greatest gliders, and although used by the British during WWII, they were mostly tactical observation planes; drone bombers at best. The Hornet, on the other hand, was a piston-engine fighter plane used by the RAF, built by the de Havilland company. What this has to do with glam rock and powerpop takes on classic 60’s music is beyond me, but I can tell you that John Paul Allen’s angry insect logo is the antithesis of the pure joy coming out of the speakers when The Slingsby Hornets are playing.

Whatever Happened To is the follow-up to 2007’s Introducing The Fantastic Sounds of; like its predecessor it’s a one-man studio effort from Allen. Boasting a dense layer of guitars, stacked vocals and a simple but uncluttered rhythm section, Allen blends five original pop songs inbetween covers of classic garage and glam singles like “Pictures Of Matchstick Men” and “Rock’n’Roll Love Letter”. His solo vocals are more breathy than powerful, but the layered harmonies are skillful, even within production that’s smaller in scale that some of the bands you’ll be reminded of (Jellyfish, XTC and especially Queen – Brian May is obviously an influence). But there’s no denying the pure love of the music, but anyone that can cover The Osmonds and ABBA with the same respect as The Move and T. Rex is okay in my book. I really like the originals, especially “The Long Way Home” and “Black & White Movie”, but the covers are obviously the draw. My favorites are Klaatu‘s “Calling Occupants” and Marc Bolan‘s “Children of the Revolution” in which Allen also incorporates the related “Buick Mackane”.

My copy of the new album included the Knee Deep In Glitter EP which features five covers, including Cliff Richard‘s “Devil Woman” and “Skweeze Me Pleeze Me” by Slade. The guitars are much louder and overall the music rocks harder, even the chugging version of “Does Your Mother Know”. As with all Slingsby Hornets covers, they’re anything but straightforward copies of the original.

Introducing also has five originals, the best of which is the synth/guitar duel of “The Man From Yesterday” and the more delicate “Stop The Rain”. I’m no fan of Captain and Tenille so I’m not crazy about a cover of “Love Will Keep Us Together”, but at least it adds some muscle to the melody. I much prefer his take on “Fire Brigade” and  a cover of “My Sharona” that sounds like Brian May (yes, again) jamming with Todd Rundgren. Again, Allen wisely alternates his originals with the diverse covers, as if to show that any radio station (or pair of ears) that would appreciate one would also find the other appealing. Use the CD Baby links above or check their MySpace page for more details and sound clips.

***

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