Tag Archives: The Tremblers

T.G.I.F. – Ten for Bill Pitcock IV (R.I.P.)

Bill Pitcock IV might not be a household name, but anyone who has ever heard a Dwight Twilley album – and I sure hope you have heard several – is feeling a bit sad today. Pitcock died this morning in Tulsa.

Pitcock was (pun fully intended) instrumental in the sound of The Dwight Twilley Band. In fact, the band recorded in a shop owned by Bill’s Dad. To say that Dwight, Phil Seymour and Bill made magic is a vast understatement.

Tons of Twilley song clips here.

For all the recent accolades about Leon Russell – well deserved, mind you – it was his split with Denny Cordell that tanked Shelter Records and almost sunk the careers of Dwight Twilley and Tom Petty. It certainly derailed the release of Sincerely, where “I’m On Fire” was an aptly named track except that no one could find the album in the stores. By the time they could, the heat was off, and who knows whether that doomed Twilley to “almost brass ring” status. Even Petty didn’t click widely until Damn The Torpedoes; his first two albums are just as good and the first three are better than the rest combined.

Pitcock continued to record with Twilley on and off over the years, most recently back in the fold for the Blimp album. Bill also just released his first solo album Play What You Mean. Check out Bills MySpace site or go to Amazon to hear some tracks.

So R.I.P. Bill Pitcock IV – your ringing guitars will live forever at my house. Here are Ten For Bill Pitcock on this week’s TGIF

(01) – “Twilley Don’t Mind” – yeah, that bass player is who you think he is.

(02) – “You Were So Warm” – how was this not #1?

(03) – “Trying To Find My Baby

(04) – “Precious To Me“- I hope Bill is playing with Phil today.

(05) – “Feeling In The Dark

(06) – “Girls” – the uncensored video

(07) – “Looking For The Magic

(08) – “Baby It’s You” – more Phil Seymour magic.

(09) – “I’ll Be Taking Her Out Tonight” – he and Geo Conner played guitar on The Tremblers album

(10) – “I’m On Fire” – Acoustic version, 2010, followed by the original.

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Listen, People (Part 2)

On Thursday I waxed poetic about a recent concert featuring The Rascals, The Turtles and Herman’s Hermits and left off at intermission. Here’s the rest…

Peter Noone 2009

I wondered why Herman’s Hermits was set up as the sole act past intermission, an obvious headline ploy (as if the posters didn’t make it clear enough).  As the lights dimmed after intermission, a huge Union Jack dropped down across the upstage scrim in tandem with explosive fanfare and British anthems blaring. But when Peter Noone hit the stage with four younger, energetic musicians dressed as if it was 1964, my question was answered. The British were coming…again!

Peter Noone is 62 but looks like he’s in his mid-40s and sings like he’s in his 20s. In reality, by the time he was twenty, Herman’s Hermits were just about done. But on this night in a packed auditorium, the only sign of age was in the crowd; the band was on fire and gave the songs a boost they never had in their original form; for the most part they sounded as good or better.

Noone led the band through an entire catalogue of beloved songs, and as each one played two points dominated my thoughts. First, every one of these tunes was melodic, crisp and fun, and he and the band played them with such enthusiasm and life that they should just hit the club circuit and win over a whole new generation of fans; ones who avoid “oldies shows” like the plague. And second…my God, this was a prolific band!

What were you doing at sixteen?

When people talk about the great bands of the ’60s, Herman’s Hermits seldom enters the discussion. Why not? For starters, just look at this string of singles five Top Five hits…in five months! A dozen singles in the Top 15 in just over two years. Amazingly, in 1965, they outsold The Beatles in the United States!

And in addition to their own great material, Noone filled out the show with tributes both sincere and funny. Peers like Freddy and The Dreamers, Peter and Gordon and Chad and Jeremy got their due with excellent cover versions of some of their hits. But Noone’s funny between-song banter and occasionally randy storytelling also gave him an opportunity to imitate artists from Mick Jagger to The Sex Pistols (!) as the band launched into segments of “Start Me Up” and “Pretty Vacant”.  There was also a running gag about The Turtles being old men, although like Peter,  Mark Volman and Howard Kalyan are also 62 (their birthdays are a few months apart). It was just banter between and about old friends, playfully mocking them for being asleep in the limo before it gets to the hotel and wondering if it was their set list taped to the floor “because there’s only four hits on it“.

Like many UK groups from the pre-Beatles  era, there’s a strong music hall influence bleeding through their material, whether it’s vaudevillian jokes  about dim people requesting “She’s A Muscular Boy”, or the bounce in pop chestnuts like “Dandy” and “Can’t You Hear My Heartbeat”. Until Noone pointed it out, I hadn’t realized that part of the charm about Herman’s Hermits was the unrelenting joy in their songs. Maybe “Mrs. Brown You’ve Got a Lovely Daughter” is a little sad, but only “The End of the World” is truly morose. The rest can’t help put a smile on your face.

The Tremblers 1980

He also wove in a couple of tracks from his underrated skinny-tie era album with The Tremblers and cheekily made up a song about his lifelong dream to be in this very theatre on this very night. By the time the vocal participation challenge went out to the audience during “I’m Henry VIII, I Am”, he had the entire crowd in the palm of his hand (not that there hadn’t been a few eating out of it since the moment he walked onto the stage). Knowing the show was closing with “There’s a Kind of Hush”, the audience was on their feet mid-song, providing Noone and band a lengthy standing ovation for what was truly a dynamic ninety minute show. The post-show autograph and merch line was enormous, and Noone graciously shook every hand and signed every item.

Some bands from long ago trot themselves out for these events to get a little adulation, connect with their glory days and make a little coin (sadly, perhaps for the first time in their career). Peter Noone and his new version of Herman’s Hermits might be a nostalgic act because of their catalogue, but their presentation, energy and musical chops were fresh and vibrant. No doubt they could kick the ass of a lot of current pop acts.

I’m not certain if Peter is writing songs these days, or even if he’s entertaining cutting new material in addition to bringing the old hits to his loyal fanbase of Noonatics. But he’s talented as hell, is a consummate entertainer, and he’s proven time and time again that he can deliver the goods. The Hermits era speaks for itself. The Tremblers album from 1980 still sounds wonderful. And as recently as 2001 he guested on pop wunderkind Richard X Heyman’s ep titled Heyman, Hoosier and Herman and nailed it with “Hoosier Girl”.

Someone get this guy and this band into a studio, get them the right material, and have at it. Something tells me we’d be into something good.

Peter Noone website.

Wiki pages for Peter and Herman’s Hermits.

Grab that Tremblers album!

56 tracks of Hermits

Heyman Hoosier Herman

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Blast From The Past: Herman’s Hermits

So what were *you* doing when you were 15 years old?

So what were *you* doing at fifteen years old?

 Although Herman’s Hermits were never taken as seriously as The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Animals or The Kinks (to just name of few of their contemporaries), they were a dominant force on the pop charts in the 60s, and unbelievably outsold The Beatles in America in 1965. Like many of those bands, they started as a tight r&b band (as evidenced by guitarist Lek Lekenby’s guitar work on this DVD) until pop stardom took them in another direction. The American market was receptive to novelty hits like “I’m Henry VIII I Am” (which wouldn’t fly in the UK), and although the band was now pigeonholed into “the boys next door”, their success was phenomenal, with one charted single after another in rapid succession. But when MGM’s financial woes caused a lull in their output, The Monkees exploded onto the scene and things were never quite the same.

Producer Mickie Most helped manager Harvey Lisberg control their career with his knack for selecting hit singles (similar to the role Don Kirschner would play for The Monkees), and thanks to his connections young studio musicians Jimmy Page and John Paul Jones played on many of the early records. But this DVD, a televised special from Australia in 1966, clearly shows that the band could hold their own quite nicely. The footage is not bad quality, considering its age, and there are no sync problems and very few jumps.

For some odd reason there are two versions of the show – the original thirty minute broadcast and a “2007 mix” where the footage is enhanced by animation, graphics and some visual tricks straight out of a 60s acid flashback movie. Stick with the original; the latter is useless and annoying to watch. The band looks and sounds great, performing nine hits with three interruptions for the oddly risque commercials for Hilton “ladderproof” nylons (who knew?).

But the real value on the DVD is in the bonus features. Along with an odd video for “No Milk Today” and behind-the-scenes trailers for two of their movies (with amusing commentary) we also get performance clips from German and Norweigan TV programs; it’s a treat to watch them tackle  “Dandy” (The Kinks) and “Bus Stop” (“The Hollies“).  “The Hermits Story” is a short documentary that includes Most, Lisberg, writer Johnny Rogan and band members Karl Green, Keith Hopwood and Barry Whitwaw, among others. The documentary looks like it was dubbed from a damaged videotape, but despite the occasional smear it’s fascinating to watch.

Years later I saw the Herman-less Hermits play a club show. Wearing white suits and telling ribald jokes between songs, they were the antithesis of the young and innocent image of the original band. But of course, that whole cheeky image was a calculated act; these guys were as crazed as any group of teenage boys would be tossed into a world of madness. Peter Noone continues to sound great, having later success with The Tremblers and on various oldies tours; even collaborating with Richard X Heyman on a great EP.

Highly recommend picking this DVD up. The price is low, the value is high, and the memories are priceless..

 hermans hermits

Buy this DVD at Amazon.

The Herman’s Hermits website.

The video for “No Milk Today” on the DVD isn’t as good as this one.

A TV performance of “Kind of a Hush” with live vocal from Peter.

Peter Noone resurfaced in 1978 with The Tremblers.

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