Tag Archives: Three Stooges

Under The Radar: Rex Daisy

Another one from the pile that I haven’t played in years.

Rex Daisy was one of those bands who fell between the cracks for most people. Here’s the original review as it ran in Consumable Online almost thirteen years ago.

Here’s a band that’s been through the grist mill – signed, ignored and dropped before the record ever came out on the major label. Whether their carefree attitude stems from natural forces or the skid marks on their backs, Rex Daisy is daring you to like them.

Boasting a tasteless green and yellow package and a blue plastic interior (was there a sale on ink?), the package for the Guys And Dolls CD is saved by a clever cartoon cover. The rest of the booklet features, among other things, a goofy group photo, a collage of faces floating in a bed of flowers and a photo of a wedding – with two of the three band members in drag. But I’m a reviewer, I can get past this.

The initial slap of “Stooge”, the opener, is punchy enough with an infectious chorus, but my antennae are up – is this another Refreshments record where there’s one formula alterna-pop tune and the rest is bar band filler? Maybe so –  “Brand New Friend” (after the Eels, the second best toy piano intro I’ve heard in a while) and the older “Stuck On You” follow, and I’m not in wow mode yet.

Then it comes on like a tidal wave. “OK, Casey” is  everything a pop tune should be, great harmonies, good hooks, sing-along chorus. Bingo. Then the Gin Blossoms-ish “Changin’ Yer Mind” kicks the tempo up a notch. Merseybeat and Cheap Trick cross-pollinate with the rollicking “Bottom O’ The World” before the Byrds-like “The Last Pufferbird” (no pun), another strong track. Another favorite is the bluesy ballad “Distance” with its lonesome guitar and desperate vocal.

Ten songs would have been fine, but tacked on the end is their serious take of the “Welcome Back Kotter” theme (from the previously issued Pravda samplers) and a second version of the song 2:15, sung in Spanish for all you romantics out there. No extra charge.

I’m glad I got past the initial roadblocks and gave the disk a chance – the middle four songs are outstanding, and two or three others have grown on me as well. So forget the warning signs and dive in. For three guys trying to look goofy and out of place, there’s a good pop heart beating underneath. Besides, the Presidents of the United States of America have that Three Stooges schtick down pat.

Rex Daisynot dead, just resting” on MySpace.

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T.G.I.F. – Ten Birthdays

It’s hard to believe, but it’s been thirty years since Bon Scott died. For a man who used to mark time based upon how long ago the Kennedy Assassination occurred, imagine how old I felt this morning when I realized that AC/DC has had a new singer for three decades.

So let’s accentuate the positive, shall we? I don’t know what it is about Memorial Day that causes such a spike in famous conceptions – maybe the exuberance of getting out of school – but February 19th has given us a boatload of charismatic, talented artists over the years. Here are ten people born today who bring me great joy, chronologically by birth year:

Louis Calhern, 1895 – You might not recognize his name if you aren’t a film buff, but Calhern was a solid and versatile actor that kept popping up in some of my favorite movies, from James Cagney flicks to Marx Brothers romps (Duck Soup) to classic film noir like his sleazy lawyer crime boss in The Asphalt Jungle.

Lee Marvin, 1924 – A tough guy’s tough guy and one of the best actors of his time. Far too many great movies to list – my favorite remains the lesser rated version of The Killers – but unforgettable in The Dirty Dozen, Cat Ballou and The Professionals as well as hundreds of TV appearances, including his own classic police series M Squad.

* The finale of The Killers – including the greatest last line ever.

John Frankenheimer, 1930 – One of my favorite film makers and one of the best action movie directors (Grand Prix, Ronin) who got his start filming over a hundred live television dramas. Some of his classics include The Manchurian Candidate, Birdman of Alcatraz and the political thriller Seven Days in May.

Sam Myers, 1936 – Sam grew up in Chicago and sat in with the cream of the blues legends from Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf and Elmore James; he was an incredible drummer and harp player and vocalist. Perhaps better known more recently as a key member of Anson Funderburgh & The Rockets, one of the best live blues bands around. Sam passed away in 2006.

* Video: Sam Myers

Smokey Robinson, 1940 – The word genius gets passed around far too freely, but Smokey Robinson is a genius. Equally adept as a songwriter and as a sweet soul singer, he helped put Motown (and several of its groups) on the map in the 60’s, and his catalogue of great music is simply staggering. Check out his entry at the All Music Guide where the list of covers of his material is forty-six pages long.

Lou Christie, 1943 – Christie’s trademark was singing the verses in his normal voice and then rocketing to a powerful falsetto voice for the dramatic chorus, and although “Two Faces Have I” was the first hit, it was “Lightning Strikes” that jumped out of that transistor radio for me. He only had  two more hits ( “Rhapsody in the Rain” and “I’m Gonna Make You Mine”) but he remains a favorite of mine to this day.

Tony Iommi, 1948 – Hearing the first Black Sabbath album upon its release was a revelation, and Iommi’s signature guitar sound was the key ingredient in that mix;  some credit him with inventing heavy metal guitar. I was never a big fan of the post-Ozzy group (or Ozzy post-Sabbath, for that matter) but the first four albums were incredible.

Mark Andes, 1948 – Not a household name by any stretch, but any music fan knows Spirit and Jo Jo Gunne and Firefall and Heart; not a bad track record for a wandering bass player. Most recently a member of Ian McLagan’s Bump Band, his first solo album was released last year.

* Listen to “Run Run Run” by Jo Jo Gunne

Ray Winstone, 1957 – For his own generation, a combination of the aforementioned James Cagney and Lee Marvin. Long revered by his homeland, roles in Sexy Beast and The Departed might be more familiar, plus he steals Mel Gibson‘s new film out from under him.

Benicio del Toro, 1967 – Quietly building an incredible resume of performances – although maybe not that quietly based on the award hardware he’s racked up. First saw him as Kevin Spacey‘s assistant in Swimming With Sharks, and he’s made great choices including Traffic, Sin City and The Pledge. Hell, he’s going to play Moe Howard in the upcoming Three Stooges movie! But I’ll always think of him as marble-mouthed Fred Fenster in that perfect film The Usual Suspects. (Check out this amazing Fenster montage someone put up at YouTube).

No slight to Seal, Jon Fishman, Justine Bateman, Jeff Daniels, Sir Cedric Hardwicke, Merle Oberon, Carson McCullers or even Copernicus, but ten is ten.

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T.G.I.F. – Ten TV Memories

Cheesey? Gouda nuff for me at the time.

Cheesey? Gouda nuff for me at the time.

R.I.P. Soupy Sales.

Nostalgia is an odd thing. I think no matter how hard you try to explain something to a future generation, life goes through so many changes so fast that what was important and relevant to one generation seems odd and arcane to the next. Try explaining how you were mesmerized by the technology of “Pong” on a monochrome 12″ monitor to a kid playing “Halo 3” on a 50″ HDTV with surround sound. I’m sure that children of today who text message each other as a primary method of communication will seem like cavemen to those communicating wordlessly through sensory implants sometime in the future.

I say this only because I know some will look at these clips and just not get it. And that’s okay, not everything transcends time. But it’s pretty amazing that as a child in New York City I was able to find plenty of entertaining diversions on television even though there were only three stations, and none of them broadcast 24/7. As an adult with digital cable, I’m stunned that there sometimes isn’t a single viable program during a particular hour. Perhaps it’s the ability for children to be open-minded enough to find the value in anything. Perhaps it’s the fact that it’s all been done so many times, I’m jaded.

But I fondly remember looking forward to certain programs after school and on Saturday mornings. One of these was The Soupy Sales Show, a “kiddie show” that featured corny puns, some zingers aimed way over kid’s heads, and two of the most unlikely sidekicks on television, Black Tooth and White Fang.  Soupy played his own girlfriend (in drag), a detective named Philo Kvetch (my favorite of his characters) and probably took more pies in the face than anyone outside of the Three Stooges. He wasn’t afraid of doing the silliest thing to get a laugh, and his charm radiated through the television set.

So Rest in Peace, Milton Supman, a/k/a/ Soupy Sales.

So with nostalgia on the brain – and with apologies to several other programs that could easily make this list – here are ten early childhood memories, some of which still pop up on television (and rightfully so):

 B&W TV

Soupy Sales – “Do The Mouse” and more. Most late night hosts consider interacting with the crew an integral part of the show, but you can tell from this clip just how loose and fun it must have been on set. It was always a bit crazy – including the famous incident where Soupy asked kids to tiptoe into their parents’ bedroom and send him all the pictures of the Presidents from their wallets – but he was one of a kind.

Popeye cartoons – Another show where the content was framed and introduced by an adult authority figure – in this case “Captain Jack McCarthy”, a local host posing as a sea captain in a yellow slicker. I seem to recall that the Popeye cartoons ranged from the classic Max Fleischer originals to the later King Features editions, but I was a mere Swee’pea at the time.

The Three Stooges – When dozens of previously filmed “shorts” were made available to television, someone got the brilliant idea of marketing them to children. The Three Stooges show was also staged with an adult authority figure (“Officer Joe Bolton was the guy in NYC) who would open the program and introduce the film and a cartoon. And parents were rightly concerned that a new generation of kids would want to poke each other in the eyes.

Abbott and Costello – Not to be confused with their movies, The Abbott and Costello Show was a half hour comedy program that was a framework for the duo to perform gags and burlesque routines under the guise of a sitcom. The show originally aired before I was born but was shown in syndication for years.

Shindig – Hard to believe there was more great rock’n’roll on television in the early ’60s than there is now. Check out the guests on this last episode and the legacy of artists who…uh…shindug. This was hip at the time.

Where The Action IsDick Clark’s follow-up to American Bandstand featured Paul Revere and the Raiders as the virtual house band and was loaded with great bands and songs for thirsty music lovers like me.

The Little Rascals – I’m sure they mixed in Our Gang comedies along with the Little Rascals flicks, but the premise was the same. And odd collection of precious and precocious children with little or no adult supervision, a dilemma and usually a lesson learned. Not a happy ending in real life, though.

Hullabaloo – Yet another font of great music, this show occupied the Monday time slot that eventually went to another staple of my youthful TV diet, The Monkees. The show tried to bridge the generation gap a bit by having established artists introduce newer ones.

Rocky and Bullwinkle – Hilariously subversive and one of the best written shows ever on the air. Like many children I enjoyed the campy stories, bad puns and funny characters (not to mention the additional features including Aesop and Son and Fractured Fairy Tales). As an adult, I’m getting the jokes I can’t believe the censors missed!

The Adventures of SupermanGeorge Reeves was already dead and gone by the time I was religiously watching the program at dinnertime every weekday. I must have seen every episode of this show fifty times each.

And for your bonus round…

The Bowery Boys – Also known as the Dead End Kids, the Little Tough Guys and the East Side Kids, the Bowery Boys were a more comic descendant of the Depression-era street kids from movies like Angels With Dirty Faces and Dead End. I’ve had a lifelong argument with my father about who the leader of the gang was, but that depends upon whether you are discussing the original crime drama films or the comedy flicks. Billy Halop was the film guy but Leo Gorcey was the undisputed leader of the comic programs. Saturday mornings will never be the same without Slip Mahoney and Sach (Huntz Hall).

I gotta investegrate this citation

I gotta investegrate this citation

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